Women at Risk for Cardiovascular Disease Lack Knowledge of Heart Attack Symptoms

Authors

  • Laura E. Flink MD, MS,

    1. Center for Women's Health, Division of Cardiology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York
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  • Robert R. Sciacca Eng ScD,

    1. Center for Women's Health, Division of Cardiology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York
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  • Michael L. Bier,

    1. Center for Women's Health, Division of Cardiology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York
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  • Juviza Rodriguez AB,

    1. Center for Women's Health, Division of Cardiology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York
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  • Elsa-Grace V. Giardina MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Women's Health, Division of Cardiology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York
    • Division of Cardiology, PH-346, 622 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032
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Abstract

Background:

It is not known whether cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk level is related to knowledge of the leading cause of death of women or heart attack symptoms.

Hypothesis:

Women with higher CVD risk estimated by Framingham Risk Score (FRS) or metabolic syndrome (MS) have lower CVD knowledge.

Methods:

Women visiting primary care clinics completed a standardized behavioral risk questionnaire. Blood pressure, weight, height, waist size, fasting glucose, and lipid profile were assessed. Women were queried regarding CVD knowledge.

Results:

Participants (N = 823) were Hispanic women (46%), non-Hispanic white (37%), and non-Hispanic black (8%). FRS was determined in 278: low (63%), moderate (29%), and high (8%); 24% had ≥3 components of MS. The leading cause of death was answered correctly by 54%, heart attack symptoms by 67%. Knowledge was lowest among racial/ethnic minorities and those with less education (both P< 0.001). Increasing FRS was inversely associated with knowing the leading cause of death (low 72%, moderate 68%, high 45%, P = 0.045). After multivariable adjustment, moderate/high FRS was inversely associated with knowing symptoms (moderate odds ratio [OR] 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.28-0.98; high OR 0.29, 95% CI: 0.11–0.81), but not the leading cause of death. MS was inversely associated with knowing the leading cause of death (P< 0.001) or heart attack symptoms (P = 0.018), but not after multivariable adjustment.

Conclusions:

Women with higher FRS were less likely to know heart attack symptoms. Efforts to target those at higher CVD risk must persist, or the most vulnerable may suffer disproportionately, not only because of risk factors but also inadequate knowledge. Clin. Cardiol. 2011 DOI: 10.1002/clc.22092

This work was supported in part by the US Department of Health and Human Services (1HHCWH05003-01-11); Arlene and Joseph Taub Foundation, Paterson, New Jersey; Edwina and Charles Adler Foundation; and by Columbia University's CTSA grant, UL1-RR024156 from the NCRR/NIH.

The authors have no other funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose.

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