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Bioremediation of Phenanthrene by Mycoplana sp. MVMB2 Isolated from Contaminated Soil

Authors

  • Mahalingam Brinda Lakshmi,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, A.C. College of Technology, Anna University, Chennai, India
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  • Venkataramagounder Perumal Anandaraj,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, A.C. College of Technology, Anna University, Chennai, India
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  • Manickam Velan

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, A.C. College of Technology, Anna University, Chennai, India
    • Department of Chemical Engineering, A.C. College of Technology, Anna University, Sardar Patel Road, Chennai 600 025, India
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Abstract

The effect of nutrient and surfactant addition on the biodegradation of phenanthrene was studied in a batch scale soil–slurry system using isolated Mycoplana sp. MVMB2strain. The study was conducted using an artificially phenanthrene spiked and as well as contaminated soil from petrochemical industrial site. Maximum phenanthrene degradation and subsequent high microbial growth were observed at optimum pH (pH 6) and C/N/P ratio (100:20:3). To investigate maximum substrate degradation potential of Mycoplana sp. MVMB2, very high concentrations of phenanthrene (50–200 mg/kg soil) were used. The organism was capable of degrading >60% for a concentration below 20 mg/kg soil and >40% for concentrations up to 200 mg/kg within 8 days. Further the influence of five different surfactants namely Span 80, Tween 20, Triton X-100, cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide, and sodium dodecyl sulfate were tested at their critical micelle concentration (CMC) levels for phenanthrene degradation in the soil. The addition of surfactant enhanced the biodegradation and a maximum of 84.49% was obtained for Triton X-100. Complete phenanthrene degradation by Mycoplana sp. MVMB2 was observed at 3 CMC concentration of Triton X-100. The optimized parameters obtained were used for the degradation of phenanthrene present in the contaminated soil and 98.6% biodegradation was obtained. Thus, the results obtained in the study suggested that biodegradation of phenanthrene by Mycoplana sp. MVMB2 appeared to be feasible to remediate phenanthrene rich contaminated sites.

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