CLEAN – Soil, Air, Water

Cover image for CLEAN – Soil, Air, Water

August 2011

Volume 39, Issue 8

Pages 711–805

  1. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Review
    4. Research Articles
    5. Biotec Visions
    1. Atmospheric Lead in PM2.5 after Leaded Gasoline Phase-out in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia (pages 711–719)

      Hani M. Aburas, Mohamed A. Zytoon and Mohammed I. Abdulsalam

      Article first published online: 2 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201000510

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      Twenty-four air samples were collected at four locations throughout Jeddah during the period from December 23, 2008 to April 6, 2009. The collected PM2.5-samples were analyzed by ICP-MS for determination of lead. Atmospheric lead concentration was dependent on the sampling location. Jeddah compares favorably with many other world cities regarding atmospheric lead pollution.

    2. Metabolomic Study on the Halophyte Suaeda salsa in the Yellow River Delta (pages 720–727)

      Xiaoli Liu, Linbao Zhang, Liping You, Huifeng Wu, Jianmin Zhao, Ming Cong, Fei Li, Qing Wang, Lianzhen Li, Chenghua Li, Guangxuan Han, Guangmei Wang, Chuanhai Xia and Junbao Yu

      Article first published online: 2 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201000515

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      The results revealed that the solvent system methanol/water (1:1) is preferable for the extraction method for NMR metabolomics from Suaeda salsa in terms of sample throughput, reproducibility, and extraction yield.

    3. Comparison of Extraction Procedures for Assessing Soil Metal Bioavailability of to Wheat Grains (pages 728–734)

      Dilek Bakircioglu, Yasemin Bakircioglu Kurtulus and Hilmi İbar

      Article first published online: 13 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201000501

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      Based on the comparison between single extraction procedures and sequential extraction procedure one can conclude that the HCl, EDTA, and DTPA procedures properly predict the bioavailability of Pb and Ni in soils to wheat grains. The BCR CaCl2 and H2O extraction procedures were inadequate indicators for trace metal uptake by plants.

    4. Phytoremediation of heavy metal-contaminated water and sediment by Eleocharis acicularis (pages 735–741)

      Masayuki Sakakibara, Yuko Ohmori, Nguyen Thi Hoang Ha, Sakae Sano and Koichiro Sera

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201000488

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      E. acicularis can be easily cultivated and controlled in environments with abundant water. It hyperaccumulates Cu, Zn, As, and Cd, and thus, showing great potential for the phytoremediation of water environments contaminated by heavy metals at mining sites.

  2. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Review
    4. Research Articles
    5. Biotec Visions
    1. Modeling of Biological Water and Wastewater Treatment Processes Using Artificial Neural Networks (pages 742–749)

      Ali R. Khataee and Masoud B. Kasiri

      Article first published online: 13 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201000234

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      This review reveals that ANN modeling requires no additional information on the mechanism and the kinetics of biodegradation of treated contaminants and time-consuming kinetic investigations can therefore be avoided. ANNs might be useful in process modeling, optimization, as well as in the design, scale-up, and industrial application of water and wastewater biological treatment processes.

  3. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Review
    4. Research Articles
    5. Biotec Visions
    1. A New Polyelectrolyte Dosing Method: Injection into Deep Bed Filter Media (pages 750–758)

      Ebubekir Yuksel, Murat Eyvaz, Tugrul S. Aktas and Ahmet M. Saatci

      Article first published online: 3 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201000277

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      In this study, a polyelectrolyte injection method that has not been tried earlier was studied. The results showed that simultaneous polyelectrolyte additions to the entrance and into the midpoint of the filter media produced better effluent quality and longer filter run time compared to polyelectrolyte addition only to the inlet of the filter.

    2. Assessment of Clam Ruditapes philippinarum as Heavy Metal Bioindicators Using NMR-Based Metabolomics (pages 759–766)

      Xiaoli Liu, Linbao Zhang, Liping You, Junbao Yu, Ming Cong, Qing Wang, Fei Li, Lianzhen Li, Jianmin Zhao, Chenghua Li and Huifeng Wu

      Article first published online: 2 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201000410

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      It could be shown here that the Liangdao Red clam exhibited more sensitive disturbances in the osmoregulation, energetic metabolisms, and neurotoxicities to mercury exposure. Thus, the Liangdao Red pedigree could be a bioindicator in the marine and coastal ecotoxicology.

    3. Adsorption of Chromium(III), Nickel(II), and Copper(II) from Aqueous Solution by Activated Alumina (pages 767–773)

      Nilima S. Rajurkar, Ashok N. Gokarn and Kumaree Dimya

      Article first published online: 3 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201000273

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      The results indicate that activated aluminum powder is a promising adsorbent for Cr(III), Ni(II), and Cu(II) for industrial wastewater treatment. The adsorption process followed Langmuir as well as Freundlich models and the thermodynamic studies indicated that the adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic.

    4. Degradation and Detoxification of Chlorophenols in Continuous-Flow Fixed-Bed Aerobic Reactors (pages 774–780)

      Alfredo Gallego, Virginia L. Gemini, Susana L. Rossi, Carlos E. Gómez, Gustavo D. Bulus Rossini and Sonia E. Korol

      Article first published online: 3 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201000340

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      A bacterial strain of Delftia sp. able to degrade DCP and a bacterial community that degrades TCP were employed to inoculate continuous flow biofilm aerobic reactors in order to study the biodegradation and detoxification. Delftia sp. was able to remove an average of 95.6% of DCP.

    5. Enhancement of Biogas Generation by Addition of Lipase in the Co-Digestion of Tannery Solid Wastes (pages 781–786)

      Kanchinadham Sri Bala Kameswari, Chitra Kalyanaraman, Subramanian Porselvam and Kumarasami Thanasekaran

      Article first published online: 14 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201000408

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      The application of steapsin lipase during co-digestion of tannery solid wastes was investigated. The hydrolysis could be improved and it could be observed that up to a 15% increase in the biogas generation was achievable compared with the control. Thus, the operating cost could be reduced, if a crude enzyme extracted from biomass instead of the lipase will be used.

    6. New Larvicidal Acetogenin from the Red Alga Laurencia papillosa (pages 787–794)

      Zeinab S. Abou-Elnaga, Walied M. Alarif and Sultan S. Al-lihaibi

      Article first published online: 2 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201000597

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      Studies on the non-polar extract of the red alga L. papillosa yielded a new C15 acetogenin (cyclic enyne), (12E)-cis-maneonene-E (1) and (12Z)-trans-maneonene-B (2) together with different secondary metabolites. Compound 1 showed high potential as a natural insecticide against the confused flour beetle larvae Tribolium confusum and Culex pipiens mosquito larvae.

    7. A Comparative Study of Ozonation, Homogeneous Catalytic Ozonation, and Photocatalytic Ozonation for C.I. Reactive Red 194 Azo Dye Degradation (pages 795–805)

      A. Özlem Yıldırım, Şermin Gül, Orkide Eren and Erdal Kuşvuran

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201000192

      The UV-VIS spectrum of RR 194 has two main adsorption bands: The benzene and naphthalene group at 294nm and the azo group at 522nm. The ozonation process not only induced a rapid decolorization of the dye but also caused significant degradation of the aromatic structure.

  4. Biotec Visions

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Review
    4. Research Articles
    5. Biotec Visions
    1. BiotecVisions 2011, August (pages A1-A8)

      Article first published online: 15 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201190004

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