CLEAN – Soil, Air, Water

Cover image for CLEAN – Soil, Air, Water

January 2012

Volume 40, Issue 1

Pages 7–109

  1. Research Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Article
    3. Review
    4. Research Articles
    5. Short Communication
    6. BiotecVisions
    1. Effects of Vegetation Restoration on Soil Physical Properties in the Wind–Water Erosion Region of the Northern Loess Plateau of China (pages 7–15)

      Wang Li, Mu Yan, Zhang Qingfeng and Jia Zhikaun

      Article first published online: 11 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100367

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      The results indicate that that natural restoration is a suitable and preferable mode of re-vegetation in wind–water erosion affected regions. However, non-native plant species with high water requirements which lead to soil degradation are not suitable to re-establish vegetation.

  2. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Article
    3. Review
    4. Research Articles
    5. Short Communication
    6. BiotecVisions
    1. Remediation of Radionuclide Pollutants through Biosorption – an Overview (pages 16–23)

      Nilanjana Das

      Article first published online: 11 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201000522

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      This paper reviews the achievements and the current status of radionuclide remediation through biosorption. To attract more usage of biosorption technology, some strategies have to be developed where further processing of biosorbent can be done to regenerate the biomass and then convert the recovered radionuclide into a usable form.

  3. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Article
    3. Review
    4. Research Articles
    5. Short Communication
    6. BiotecVisions
    1. Pollution Source Investigation and Water Quality Management in the Carp Lake Watershed, Taiwan (pages 24–33)

      Chia-Hsien Yen, Ku-Fan Chen, Yih-Terng Sheu, Chi-Chwen Lin and Jao-Jia Horng

      Article first published online: 11 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100152

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      Remedial strategies from short-term to long-term have been successfully developed with the help of the calibrated WASP model. These developed strategies could be helpful for water quality management.

    2. Simultaneous Growth of Spirulina platensis and Removal of Hardness in Van Lake Water (pages 34–38)

      Olcayto Keskinkan, Oya Işık, Turan Yılmaz, Behzat Balcı, Leyla H. Uslu and Çağatayhan B. Ersü

      Article first published online: 11 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201000332

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      Batch experiments for S. platensis cultivations were carried out in Van Lake water and the results indicate that the method is appropriate for long-term cultivation. The increase of pH to >10.38 associated with Spirulina growth resulted in the precipitation of hardness causing compounds with a 70% decrease in hardness.

    3. Toxic Effects of Copper-Based and Synthetic Organic Pesticides on Activated Sludge (pages 39–44)

      Berrak Erol Nalbur, Sevil Çalışkan Eleren, Semih Şahin and Ufuk Alkan

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201000601

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      The results indicated that toxicity effects of copper-based pesticides were higher than that of synthetic organic pesticides. The addition of test pesticides decreased the specific oxygen uptake rate of activated sludge cultures by inducing toxic effects. Thus, activated sludge biomass may be less susceptible against synthetic organic pesticides.

    4. Removal of Pyridine from Aqueous Solution by Adsorption on an Activated Carbon Cloth (pages 45–53)

      Pedro Alonso-Davila, Oliva L. Torres-Rivera, Roberto Leyva-Ramos and Raul Ocampo-Perez

      Article first published online: 11 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100049

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      Activated carbon from coconut shells and peanut shells showed high capacities and activated carbon cloths from cellulose and polyacylonitrile exhibited reasonable capacities for adsorbing pyridine. The adsorption can be explained by mechanisms such as electrostatic interactions, π–π dispersive interactions, and chemisorption, which are pH dependent.

    5. Preparation, Characterization of a Novel Chelating Resin Functionalized with o-Hydroxybenzamide and Its Application for Preconcentration of Trace Metal Ions (pages 54–65)

      Aminul Islam, Akil Ahmad and Mohammad Asaduddin Laskar

      Article first published online: 11 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201000439

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      The chelating ability of HBAM has been utilized in developing chelating sorbents for the purpose of separation and preconcentration of trace metal ions. The results reflect its promising nature for trace metal ion analysis in various samples. The procedure is simple and fast and no organic solvents in the metal elution step are required.

    6. Removal of Copper, Nickel, and Zinc Ions from Electroplating Rinse Water (pages 66–79)

      Meyyappan Revathi, Mohan Saravanan, Ahmed Basha Chiya and Manickam Velan

      Article first published online: 11 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201000477

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      Ceralite IR 120 as a cationic exchange resin was found to be a good sorbent for the removal of Cu(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) ions from synthetic rinse waters. Most of the copper metal sorbed in the resin could be successfully eluted from the column by 1.5 M sulfuric acid.

    7. Response Surface Optimization for Removal of Cadmium from Aqueous Solution by Waste Agricultural Biosorbent Psidium guvajava L. Leaf Powder (pages 80–86)

      Karanam Srinivasa Rao, Sashi Anand, Kalyani Rout and Paladugu Venkateswarlu

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201000392

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      These studies have demonstrated the application of a full factorial central composite design for determining the optimum process conditions for maximum removal (%) of cadmium from aqueous solutions using Psidium guvajava L. leaf powder as biosorbent.

    8. Removal of COD from Industrial Effluent Containing Indigo Dye Using Adsorption Method by Activated Carbon Cloth: Optimization, Kinetic, and Isotherm Studies (pages 87–94)

      Soheil Aber and Mohsen Sheydaei

      Article first published online: 11 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201000434

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      The study shows that response surface methodology can be used to model the treatment of industrial effluent containing indigo dye. According to the results, activated carbon fiber dosage has the highest degree of impact on the treatment process. Pseudo-second-order and Freundlich models fit the process well, from kinetic and equilibrium views, respectively.

    9. Operational Cost Comparison of Several Pre-Treatment Techniques for OMW Treatment (pages 95–99)

      Tamer Coşkun, Eyüp Debik and Neslihan Manav Demır

      Article first published online: 11 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201000512

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      Pre-treatment studies of olive mill wastewaters covering centrifuging, lime precipitation, acid cracking, and electrocoagulation process performances and operational costs are compared. The results indicate that the centrifuge process is the optimum pre-treatment alternative considering removal efficiencies, operational costs, and sludge amounts.

  4. Short Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Article
    3. Review
    4. Research Articles
    5. Short Communication
    6. BiotecVisions
    1. Enhancing the Sustainability of Household Fe0/Sand Filters by Using Bimetallics and MnO2 (pages 100–109)

      Chicgoua Noubactep, Sabine Caré, Brice Donald Btatkeu K. and Charles Péguy Nanseu-Njiki

      Article first published online: 15 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100014

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The concept presented and discussed here would be useful in designing efficient and affordable water filtration systems at several scales. It also renders itself as a basis for further refinement and detailed research at laboratory and field scale. One may wonder how the Fe0 bed technology will be developed in different parts of the world.

  5. BiotecVisions

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Article
    3. Review
    4. Research Articles
    5. Short Communication
    6. BiotecVisions
    1. BiotecVisions 2012, January (pages A1-A8)

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201290000

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