CLEAN – Soil, Air, Water

Cover image for Vol. 40 Issue 10

Special Issue: Wetland Ecology in China

October 2012

Volume 40, Issue 10

Pages 1009–1210

Issue edited by: Shao Hong-Bo, Cui Bao-Shan, Bai Jun-Hong

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Outlook
    5. Review
    6. Research Articles
    7. Reviews
    8. Research Articles
    9. Erratum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Clean Soil Air Water. 10/2012

      Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201290019

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Outlook
    5. Review
    6. Research Articles
    7. Reviews
    8. Research Articles
    9. Erratum
    1. Wetland Ecology in China (pages 1009–1010)

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201270003

  3. Outlook

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Outlook
    5. Review
    6. Research Articles
    7. Reviews
    8. Research Articles
    9. Erratum
    1. Wetland Ecology in China (pages 1011–1014)

      Shao Hong-Bo, Cui Bao-Shan and Bai Jun-Hong

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201270002

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Outlook
    5. Review
    6. Research Articles
    7. Reviews
    8. Research Articles
    9. Erratum
    1. Implementation of Diversified Ecological Networks to Strengthen Wetland Conservation (pages 1015–1026)

      Baoshan Cui, Zhiming Zhang and Xiaoxia Lei

      Version of Record online: 12 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200026

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The wetland functions influence almost every aspect of the human population and the associated ecosystems. This paper reviews recent applications of network approaches to ecological conservation, focusing on their application in wetland ecosystems, and proposing a new perspective for wetland conservation.

  5. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Outlook
    5. Review
    6. Research Articles
    7. Reviews
    8. Research Articles
    9. Erratum
    1. Construction of River Channel-wetland Networks for Controlling Water Pollution in the Pearl River Delta, China (pages 1027–1035)

      Xiaoyun Fan, Baoshan Cui, Kejiang Zhang, Zhiming Zhang and Hui Zhao

      Version of Record online: 12 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100733

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      A network composed of rivers and wetlands was constructed to improve river water quality. According to the assimilative capacity of each river, wetland areas were calculated for efficiently reducing the pollutants concentration. With different retention times, different wetland areas were required to reduce the pollution load. This method is useful for policy makers in river water resources management.

    2. Wetland Network Design for Mitigation of Saltwater Intrusion by Replenishing Freshwater in an Estuary (pages 1036–1046)

      Zhiming Zhang, Baoshan Cui, Xiaoyun Fan, Kejiang Zhang, Hui Zhao and Honggang Zhang

      Version of Record online: 12 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100735

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      This study focuses on the network design and the determination of the discharge and storage capacity of wetlands. The wetland network is cost-effective and has social and ecological benefits. The design of a wetland network facilitates water resource management in the PRE and can also be easily generalized for application to other estuaries.

    3. A Wetland Network Design for Water Allocation Based on Environmental Flow Requirements (pages 1047–1056)

      Ranran Yang and Baoshan Cui

      Version of Record online: 12 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200045

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      A wetland network was designed by linking the existing and constructed patch wetlands, and the linear ones to store stormwater and alleviate water shortages. The results show that the performance of the designed wetland network was better and more effective than that of the existing network.

    4. Wetland Network Design for Mitigation of Saltwater Intrusion by Transferring Tidal Discharge (pages 1057–1063)

      Zhiming Zhang, Baoshan Cui, Bingbing Ou and Xiaoyun Fan

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200049

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      The method withdrawing saltwater from tidal rivers into wetland network is ineffective to mitigate saltwater intrusion. However, this method can be integrated into the alternative way which replenishes freshwater from upstream into tidal rivers via a wetland network to mitigate saltwater intrusion.

    5. The Changes of Wetland Network Pattern Associated with Water Quality in the Pearl River Delta, China (pages 1064–1075)

      Xiaoyun Fan, Baoshan Cui, Hui Zhao and Zhiming Zhang

      Version of Record online: 12 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200050

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      Researching ecological function of wetland in a regional scale is an important tool for studying the development of wetland system and urbanization. In this paper, the wetland network structure in Pearl River Delta was closely related with water purification capacity.

    6. Changes in Water Birds Habitat Suitability Following Wetland Restoration in the Yellow River Delta, China (pages 1076–1084)

      Yanyan Hua, Baoshan Cui and Wenjie He

      Version of Record online: 12 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200064

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      Ecological water supplement is an effective way to restore degraded wetlands caused by lack of freshwater in the study area. The results showed that habitat suitability index increased in the first 6 years but declined as soon as vegetation coverage increased.

    7. Spatial Distribution of Fe, Cu, Mn in the Surface Water System and Their Effects on Wetland Vegetation in the Pearl River Estuary of China (pages 1085–1092)

      Laibin Huang, Junhong Bai, Rong Xiao, Haifeng Gao and Peipei Liu

      Version of Record online: 12 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200017

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      Spatial distribution characteristics of Fe, Cu, and Mn in the surface water system in Panyu and Nansha Districts were measured. The MI values showed that the water quality in Nasha District was worse than that in Panyu District. The conductivity was an important factor influencing wetland vegetation.

  6. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Outlook
    5. Review
    6. Research Articles
    7. Reviews
    8. Research Articles
    9. Erratum
    1. Recent Advances in Biochar Applications in Agricultural Soils: Benefits and Environmental Implications (pages 1093–1098)

      Gang Xu, Yingchun Lv, Junna Sun, Hongbo Shao and Linlin Wei

      Version of Record online: 8 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100738

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      Biochar could be of great importance in increasing soil carbon storage and improving soil nutrient retention and nutrient availability, and in maintaining the balance of soil ecosystem. Agronomic benefits of biochar application are critically highlighted and potential pitfalls and knowledge gaps were briefly discussed.

    2. A Review of Soil Nitrogen Mineralization as Affected by Water and Salt in Coastal Wetlands: Issues and Methods (pages 1099–1105)

      Junhong Bai, Haifeng Gao, Rong Xiao, Junjing Wang and Chen Huang

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200055

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      The combined application of laboratory and in situ incubation could better reflect the real nitrogen mineralization process. Moreover, modern molecular biology techniques and 15N tracing-isotope technique are more accurate to reflect the real information of microorganism and enzyme activity.

  7. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Outlook
    5. Review
    6. Research Articles
    7. Reviews
    8. Research Articles
    9. Erratum
    1. Nitrate–Nitrogen Transport in Horizontal Soil Columns of the Yellow River Delta Wetland, China (pages 1106–1110)

      Junhong Bai, Xiaofei Ye, Yuan Zhi, Haifeng Gao, Laibin Huang, Rong Xiao and Hongbo Shao

      Version of Record online: 7 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200032

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      A simulation of the movement of nitrate–nitrogen in horizontal soil columns was carried out in the laboratory. Compared to tidal flooding wetland, short-term flooding wetlands had higher risk of nitrate movement to the adjacent water, because nitrate transport rates are higher in this wetland with lower soil pH and higher sand contents.

    2. Soil Net Nitrogen Mineralization in Salt Marshes with Different Flooding Periods in the Yellow River Delta, China (pages 1111–1117)

      Haifeng Gao, Junhong Bai, Rong Xiao, Denghua Yan, Laibin Huang and Chen Huang

      Version of Record online: 26 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200031

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      Flooding generated by water and sediment regulation project of the Yellow River brought different effects on N mineralization in three wetlands. A more detailed assessment of gross mineralization and immobilization might reveal the hypothesis of N lost through denitrification and ammonia volatilization under submerged conditions.

    3. Effects of Water Level and Salinity on TN and TP Contents in Marsh Soils of the Yellow River Delta, China (pages 1118–1124)

      Peipei Liu, Junhong Bai, Qiuyi Ding, Hongbo Shao, Haifeng Gao and Rong Xiao

      Version of Record online: 12 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200029

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      TN and TP contents in the top 20-cm soils were significantly affected by salinity. The findings of this study can provide a useful reference for further research regarding the influences of tidal flooding on soil nutrients in other coastal wetlands and can contribute to efficient restoration of degraded wetlands in coastal regions.

    4. Changes in Soil Properties before and after Wetland Degradation in the Yellow River Delta, China (pages 1125–1130)

      Chen Huang, Junhong Bai, Hongbo Shao, Haifeng Gao, Rong Xiao, Laibin Huang and Peipei Liu

      Version of Record online: 26 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200030

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      This study presents a quantitative analysis on the effects of degradation on wetland soil properties. The primary objective is to find a chemical degradation index of soil as an indicator of wetland degradation.

    5. Potential Retention and Release Capacity of Phosphorus in the Newly Formed Wetland Soils from the Yellow River Delta, China (pages 1131–1136)

      Junna Sun, Gang Xu, Hongbo Shao and Shaohui Xu

      Version of Record online: 8 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100739

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      Desorption experiments showed that newly sorbed P was easily desorbed in higher initial added concentration and the desorption P significantly decreased with successive extraction in all samples. Correlation and regression analyses revealed that amorphous and free Fe/Al oxides correlated with clay content in the studied soils.

    6. Spatial and Temporal Distributions of Soil Organic Carbon and Total Nitrogen in Two Marsh Wetlands with Different Flooding Frequencies of the Yellow River Delta, China (pages 1137–1144)

      Junhong Bai, Junjing Wang, Denghua Yan, Haifeng Gao, Rong Xiao, Hongbo Shao and Qiuyi Ding

      Version of Record online: 12 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200059

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Spatial and temporal distribution patterns of C and N content and storage in two marsh wetlands with different flooding frequencies in the Yellow River Delta were studied. SOC, TN, and C/N ratios were greatly influenced by different environment factors; soil hydrology controlled by flooding frequencies could be the most important influencing factor in coastal wetlands.

    7. Relation between Enzyme Activity of Sediments and Lake Eutrophication in Grass-Type Lakes in North China (pages 1145–1153)

      Yu Zhang, Baoshan Cui, Shengrui Wang, Zhaosheng Chu, Xiaoyun Fan, Yanyan Hua and Yan Lan

      Version of Record online: 12 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200048

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      The ecological significance of oxidation–reduction enzymes can reflect organic matter (OM) and nitrogen circulation. There exists significant correlation between catalase and OM in lake sediments, so enzyme activity of sediments can serve as a biological indicator to reflect eutrophication level of grass-type lakes.

    8. Effects of Salinity and Water Depth on Germination of Phragmites australis in Coastal Wetland of the Yellow River Delta (pages 1154–1158)

      Junbao Yu, Xuehong Wang, Kai Ning, Yunzhao Li, Huifeng Wu, Yuqin Fu, Di Zhou, Bo Guan and Qianxin Lin

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100743

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      Most of coastal wetlands in the YRD are in the degradation process for seawater intrusion and human being activities from quick economic development. In order to accelerate the restoration processes, our results suggested to collect P. australis seeds in fall and winter, store them in cold-moist conditions to lose seed dormancy, then disperse the seeds artificially in the following spring to confirm seed germination and survival rates.

    9. Litter Decomposition of Six Macrophytes in a Eutrophic Shallow Lake (Baiyangdian Lake, China) (pages 1159–1166)

      Yan Lan, Baoshan Cui, Zheyuan You, Xia Li, Zhen Han, Yongtao Zhang and Yu Zhang

      Version of Record online: 12 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200056

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      The decomposition rules of dominant macrophytes in a eutrophic shallow lake are discussed here. One finding is that the initial N concentration of the litter and the nutrients mass ratios, such as the C/N ratio and N/P ratio, have significant effects on decomposition.

    10. Distribution and Contamination Assessment of Heavy Metals in Water and Soils from the College Town in the Pearl River Delta, China (pages 1167–1173)

      Rong Xiao, Junhong Bai, Haifeng Gao, Junjing Wang, Laibin Huang and Peipei Liu

      Version of Record online: 12 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200016

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      Construction operations and/or leachates from the demolition waste have increased the heavy metal burden in surface and deeper soils. The contamination of heavy metals in water due to vehicle gas deposition from traffic transportation only near a broad expressway bridge in college town in the Pearl River Delta was comparable to the Water Quality Criteria of WHO.

    11. Surficial and Vertical Distribution of Heavy Metals in Different Estuary Wetlands in the Pearl River, South China (pages 1174–1184)

      Honggang Zhang, Baoshan Cui and Kejiang Zhang

      Version of Record online: 7 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100730

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      A basis for risk assessment of heavy metals in studied wetlands and for wetland conservation in general is provided here. The vertical distribution of trace metals is classified into three patterns: linear distribution, irregular and stable distribution, and middle enrichment pattern based on the differences of vegetation composition, hydraulic conditions, and human disturbance.

    12. Developing Wetland Restoration Scenarios and Modeling Its Ecological Consequences in the Liaohe River Delta Wetlands, China (pages 1185–1196)

      Xiaowen Li, Chen Liang and Jianbin Shi

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200025

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      The issues within this study are typical for many wetlands characterized by competing land-use between nature conservation and socioeconomic activities. Using the LEDESS-based scenarios approach all selections, scenarios, classifications, and knowledge datasets must be adapted to local circumstances. The procedure itself, however, is considered to be usable for any other landscape ecological system.

    13. The Ecological Sensitivity Evaluation in Yellow River Delta National Natural Reserve (pages 1197–1207)

      Chen Liang and Xiaowen Li

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200051

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      The finding of this study was that the analytical results should not be identified as a precise description of the status in the study area, but they well reflect the local condition as a whole. It also indicates that ecological sensitivity evaluation for wetlands reverses based on GIS technology, concept of CHSI, and human interference analysis is feasible. Hence, this method has certain practical significance.

  8. Erratum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Outlook
    5. Review
    6. Research Articles
    7. Reviews
    8. Research Articles
    9. Erratum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Erratum: Characterization of Risks in Coastal Zones: A Review (page 1208)

      Mireille Escudero Castillo, Edgar Mendoza Baldwin, Rodolfo Silva Casarin, Gregorio Posada Vanegas and Maritza Arganis Juaréz

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201290011

    2. You have free access to this content
      Erratum: Sediments Quality Assessment of Jacarepaguá Lagoon: The Venue of the 2011 Rock in Rio (page 1208)

      José Tavares Araruna Júnior, Paula Elias Benedetti, Patrício José Moreira Pires and Ricardo Froitzheim Rinelli de Almeida

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201290014

    3. You have free access to this content
      Erratum: Typology of Municipal Wastewater Treatment Technologies in Latin America (pages 1208–1209)

      Adalberto Noyola, Alejandro Padilla-Rivera, Juan Manuel Morgan-Sagastume, Leonor Patricia Güereca and Flor Hernández-Padilla

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201290017

    4. You have free access to this content
      Erratum: ADM1-Based Robust Interval Observer for Anaerobic Digestion Processes (page 1209)

      José Luis Montiel-Escobar, Víctor Alcaraz-González, Hugo Oscar Méndez-Acosta and Victor González-Álvarez

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201290012

    5. You have free access to this content
      Erratum: Interval-Based Diagnosis of Biological Systems – a Powerful Tool for Highly Uncertain Anaerobic Digestion Processes (page 1209)

      Víctor Alcaraz-González, Rubén Horacio López-Bañuelos, Jean-Philippe Steyer, Hugo Oscar Méndez-Acosta, Víctor González-Álvarez and Carlos Pelayo-Ortiz

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201290015

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      Erratum: Quantification of Diclofenac in Hospital Effluent and Identification of Metabolites and Degradation Products (pages 1209–1210)

      Luciane Minetto, Francieli M. Mayer, Carlos A. Mallmann and Ayrton F. Martins

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201290018

    7. You have free access to this content
      Erratum: Biodegradation of Herbicide Propanil and Its Subproduct 3,4-Dichloroaniline in Water (page 1210)

      Rafael Roehrs, Miguel Roehrs, Sérgio L. de O. Machado and Renato Zanella

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201290013

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