CLEAN – Soil, Air, Water

Cover image for Vol. 40 Issue 9

September 2012

Volume 40, Issue 9

Pages 893–1000

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Reviews
    5. Research Articles
    6. BiotecVisions
    1. You have free access to this content
      Clean Soil Air Water. 9/2012

      Article first published online: 13 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201290030

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Reviews
    5. Research Articles
    6. BiotecVisions
    1. 21st Century: Water and Its Sustainable Management in Latin America (page 893)

      Ayrton Figueiredo Martins and Víctor Alcaraz Gonzalez

      Article first published online: 19 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201290009

  3. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Reviews
    5. Research Articles
    6. BiotecVisions
    1. Characterization of Risks in Coastal Zones: A Review (pages 894–905)

      Mireille Escudero Castillo, Edgar Mendoza Baldwin, Rodolfo Silva Casarin, Gregorio Posada Vanegas and Maritza Arganis Juaréz

      Article first published online: 19 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100679

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      A methodology for risk assessment by storm surge is presented as well as the definition of several social and physical indices that have not yet been applied. In addition some studies related to climate change effects have been carried out, which define risk and vulnerability indices for the analysis of coastal flooding resulting from the predicted sea level rise.

    2. Sediments Quality Assessment of Jacarepaguá Lagoon: The Venue of the 2011 Rock in Rio (pages 906–910)

      José Tavares Araruna Júnior, Paula Elias Benedetti, Patrício José Moreira Pires and Ricardo Froitzheim Rinelli de Almeida

      Article first published online: 19 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100667

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      The coarse sediments that present low probability of adverse effects are found in the area delineated by the red circle in Figure 5. This area is very close to the City of Rock and there is no need to transport the sediments and, in addition, it was found that those sediments were ideal for drainage facilities because their hydraulic conductivity is on the order of 10−2 cm/s.

  4. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Reviews
    5. Research Articles
    6. BiotecVisions
    1. Manmade Vulnerability of the Cancun Beach System: The Case of Hurricane Wilma (pages 911–919)

      Rodolfo Silva Casarin, Gabriel Ruiz Martinez, Ismael Mariño-Tapia, Gregorio Posada Vanegas, Edgar Mendoza Baldwin and Edgar Escalante Mancera

      Article first published online: 19 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100677

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      The analysis of the behavior of coastal systems for different time-spans and the study of the interrelationships between all natural agents and processes have significance in the prevention of undesirable consequences for people and ecosystems under hurricane conditions. For the case of Cancun, in the short term, human modifications to the coast have induced more risk than climate changes.

    2. Hydro-morphologic Revision of the Cuautla Channel at Nayarit, Mexico (pages 920–925)

      Cuauhtemoc Franco Ochoa, Edgar Mendoza Baldwin, Rodolfo Silva Casarín and Gabriel Ruiz Martínez

      Article first published online: 19 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100680

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      The water distribution throughout the Cuautla littoral sub-system has been severely altered with the construction of the channel. The results show that the channel has not reached a condition of stability: if no action is taken it will continue to grow. One can conclude that the large amount of water that is being lost through the Cuautla channel is partially the reason for the degradation of the entire Marismas Nacionales system.

    3. Typology of Municipal Wastewater Treatment Technologies in Latin America (pages 926–932)

      Adalberto Noyola, Alejandro Padilla-Rivera, Juan Manuel Morgan-Sagastume, Leonor Patricia Güereca and Flor Hernández-Padilla

      Article first published online: 19 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100707

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      The most adopted wastewater treatment techniques for Latin America and the Caribbean region are identified and classified according to their treatment capacity, together with a representative wastewater characterization. Such typology of the existing wastewater infrastructure may help for developing comprehensive mitigation strategies.

    4. ADM1-Based Robust Interval Observer for Anaerobic Digestion Processes (pages 933–940)

      José Luis Montiel-Escobar, Víctor Alcaraz-González, Hugo Oscar Méndez-Acosta and Victor González-Álvarez

      Article first published online: 19 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100718

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      A robust interval observer (RIO) based on the ADM1 model was devised to reconstruct 14 state variables of the ADM1 model using only 10 measured state variables. Under some structural and operational conditions, the RIO has the property of remaining stable under the influence of time varying parameters, system failures, load disturbances, unknown kinetics and inputs.

    5. Interval-Based Diagnosis of Biological Systems – a Powerful Tool for Highly Uncertain Anaerobic Digestion Processes (pages 941–949)

      Víctor Alcaraz-González, Rubén Horacio López-Bañuelos, Jean-Philippe Steyer, Hugo Oscar Méndez-Acosta, Víctor González-Álvarez and Carlos Pelayo-Ortiz

      Article first published online: 19 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100721

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      The interval-based FDD approach proposed here was able to detect most of faults occurring in an actual pilot-scale anaerobic digestion wastewater treatment process used for the treatment of red wine vinasse. Even in the presence of some false alarms, the proposed approach was capable to detect up to 95% of the faults and to isolate up to 75% of them.

    6. Quantification of Diclofenac in Hospital Effluent and Identification of Metabolites and Degradation Products (pages 950–957)

      Luciane Minetto, Francieli M. Mayer, Carlos A. Mallmann and Ayrton F. Martins

      Article first published online: 19 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100676

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      The outcomes of this study on diclofenac reinforce the conclusions of previous investigations dealing with the determination of pharmaceuticals in the HUSM effluent, and gives evidence of the risk associated with its emission into the regional environment.

    7. Biodegradation of Herbicide Propanil and Its Subproduct 3,4-Dichloroaniline in Water (pages 958–964)

      Rafael Roehrs, Miguel Roehrs, Sérgio L. de O. Machado and Renato Zanella

      Article first published online: 19 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100693

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      In a mixture, propanil and 3,4-DCA can be degraded faster by the bacteria strain RR02 using aeration at 30 and 37°C. The use of E. cloacae in bioremediation of pesticides could be very useful because 3,4-DCA is not a specific subproduct of propanil, but also of some phenylureas and carbamates. E. cloacae is found naturally in soil and therefore can be used in water at real conditions.

    8. Treatment of Domestic Sewage in an Anaerobic–Aerobic Fixed-bed Reactor with Recirculation of the Liquid Phase (pages 965–971)

      Antonio Pedro de Oliveira Netto and Marcelo Zaiat

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100672

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      An anaerobic–aerobic fixed-bed reactor was evaluated for nitrogen and organic matter removal from domestic sewage. The successful scale-up of the reactor was evidenced by similar performance levels in the pilot-scale reactor and the bench-scale reactor with the only exception of a lower nitrogen removal efficiency.

    9. A New Soil Sampling Design in Coastal Saline Region Using EM38 and VQT Method (pages 972–979)

      Rongjiang Yao, Jingsong Yang, Xiufang Zhao, Xiaobing Chen, Jianjun Han, Xiaoming Li, Meixian Liu and Hongbo Shao

      Article first published online: 9 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100741

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      The variance quad-tree (VQT) algorithm and apparent soil electrical conductivity measured by electromagnetic induction EM38 were used to design a sampling scheme for soil salinity in coastal saline region. The result indicated that the spatial distribution of soil salinity produced with the VQT scheme was quite similar to that produced with total sampling sites.

    10. Determination of Selected Endocrine Disrupter Compounds at Trace Levels in Sewage Sludge Samples (pages 980–985)

      Münire Selcen Sönmez, Melis Muz, Okan Tarık Komesli, Sezgin Bakırdere and Celal Ferdi Gökçay

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100403

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      Simultaneous determination of five endocrine disrupter compounds, diltiazem, progesterone, benzylbutylphthalate, estrone, and carbamazepine, at ultratrace levels was undertaken in sludge samples from six different treatment plants in Turkey by using an HPLC–ESI–MS/MS system.

    11. Comparison of Trace Elements in Bottled and Desalinated Household Drinking Water in Kuwait (pages 986–1000)

      Humood F. Al-Mudhaf and Abdel-Sattar I. Abu-Shady

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100618

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      With few exceptions, the results for the household and bottled water were found to comply with the US-EPA and WHO guideline values. The results of the current study show that the maximum daily intake of essential elements should be clearly reported on the labels of bottled water.

  5. BiotecVisions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Reviews
    5. Research Articles
    6. BiotecVisions
    1. BiotecVisions 2012, September (pages A1-A8)

      Article first published online: 19 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201290010

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