CLEAN – Soil, Air, Water

Cover image for Vol. 41 Issue 12

December 2013

Volume 41, Issue 12

Pages 1139–1241

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Research Article
    6. Review
    7. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Clean Soil Air Water. 12/2013

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201370071

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Research Article
    6. Review
    7. Research Articles
    1. Clean Soil Air Water. 12/2013

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201370072

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Research Article
    6. Review
    7. Research Articles
    1. Clean Soil Air Water. 12/2013 (pages 1139–1142)

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201370073

  4. Research Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Research Article
    6. Review
    7. Research Articles
    1. PM10 Source Apportionment in Ahvaz, Iran, Using Positive Matrix Factorization (pages 1143–1151)

      Mohammad Hossein Sowlat, Kazem Naddafi, Masud Yunesian, Peter L. Jackson, Saeedeh Lotfi and Abbas Shahsavani

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200131

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      Possible sources of PM10 in an arid area were conducted by using the positive matrix factorization (PMF) receptor model and eight factors were resolved. The results showed that almost half of the total mass of PM10 in the area originates from natural sources, while the other half is released from anthropogenic sources.

  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Research Article
    6. Review
    7. Research Articles
    1. Magnetically Separable Water Treatment Technologies and their Role in Future Advanced Water Treatment: A Patent Review (pages 1152–1156)

      Stuart Linley, Timothy Leshuk and Frank X. Gu

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100261

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      Magnetically separable nanocatalysts offer a simple and economic solution in advanced water treatment through recovery and reuse of the catalyst via application of a magnetic field. Even so, these catalysts currently face design challenges involving their application and recovery in implementable water treatment systems. This brief review focuses on emerging technologies in the form of patents that seek to address the deployment of such catalysts. The development of such water treatment techniques allows the use of economic, recyclable, environmentally friendly platforms which may see industrial implementation in the near future.

  6. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Research Article
    6. Review
    7. Research Articles
    1. Robust Regulation of Alkalinity in Highly Uncertain Continuous Anaerobic Digestion Processes (pages 1157–1164)

      Víctor Alcaraz-González, Fabián Azael Fregoso-Sanchez, Hugo Oscar Mendez-Acosta and Victor Gonzalez-Alvarez

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100736

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      The operational stability problem in AD processes is addressed from a MIMO point of view. It could be shown that by regulating the volatile fatty acids and strong ions concentrations, operational stability performance indexes stated in terms of the total alkalinity and the intermediate alkalinity/total alkalinity ratio may be satisfying under the most uncertain scenarios.

    2. Kinetics of Methyldiethanolamine Mineralization by Using UV/H2O2 Process (pages 1165–1174)

      Sabtanti Harimurti, Anisa Ur Rahmah, Abdul Aziz Omar and Murugesan Thanapalan

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200121

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      Laboratory experiments have been conducted and the profile of methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) mineralization at different temperatures by using UV/H2O2 in aqueous solution has been established. The estimated energy efficiency of this process shows a better performance compared with the MDEA mineralization using ZnO/SnO2 coupled with photocatalysts.

    3. Comparative Evaluation for Characterization of Produced Water Generated from Oil, Gas, and Oil–Gas Production Fields (pages 1175–1182)

      Hale Ozgun, Mustafa Evren Ersahin, Selime Erdem, Burcu Atay, Sema Sayili, Esra Eren, Pelin Hoshan, Doga Atay, Mahmut Altinbas, Cumali Kinaci and Ismail Koyuncu

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200204

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      The characterization study showed that the produced water varied in a wide range based on seasonal and locational variations. It is expected that the biological treatment of wastewater from gas and gas–oil field wells will be more efficient than that from oil field wells. The data can be a useful tool in the assessment of reuse option for produced water as injection water or other purposes.

    4. Cercis siliquastrum Tree Leaves as an Efficient Adsorbent for Removal of Ag(I): Response Surface Optimization and Characterization of Biosorption (pages 1183–1195)

      Javad Zolgharnein, Tahere Shariatmanesh and Neda Asanjarani

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200557

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      Removing of Ag(I) was performed from aqueous solution using a newly explored biosorbent, Cercis siliquastrum tree leaves. In this study initial pH, temperature, metal ion's initial concentration, and sorbent mass were determined to be effective parameters for this process. FT-IR, XRD analysis, and potentiometric titration illustrated that an efficient adsorption took place, and an acidic functional group (carboxyl) of sorbent was involved in the biosorption process.

    5. Changes in the Level of Proteins, Free Amino Acids and Protease Activities of Clarias batrachus in Response to Sodium meta-arsenite Intoxication (pages 1196–1200)

      Randhir Kumar and Tarun K. Banerjee

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200041

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      It could be shown that the arsenic salt causes protein degradation in several organs of the catfish C. batrachus. This was reflected in a decrease of the protein and amino acids content as well as of the protease activity.

    6. UV/H2O2 Process Under High Intensity UV Irradiation: A Rapid and Effective Method for Methylene Blue Decolorization (pages 1201–1207)

      Qian Zhang, Chaolin Li and Ting Li

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100582

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      It could be demonstrated that the UV/H2O2 process under high UV photon flux is a powerful method for the decolorization of MB: 99% decolorization efficiency of 1000 mg L−1 MB could be achieved in 180 s. The mineralization experiment revealed effectiveness also in TOC removal.

    7. Magnetic Removal of Reactive Black 5 from Wastewater Using Ionic Liquid Grafted-Magnetic Nanoparticles (pages 1208–1215)

      Tahereh Poursaberi and Mostafa Hassanisadi

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200160

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      The extraction ability of ILs is combined with the advantages of magnetic nanoparticles to fabricate a new magnetic sorbent for dye removal from wastewater. Under optimal conditions 98.5% of RB5 after a single extraction were removed. It also could be reused for six successive removal cycles.

    8. Effects of Nitrogen Fertilization on Soil Microbial Biomass and Community Functional Diversity in Temperate Grassland in Inner Mongolia, China (pages 1216–1221)

      Yating He, Yuchun Qi, Yunshe Dong, Shengsheng Xiao, Qin Peng, Xinchao Liu and Liangjie Sun

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200021

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      Decreases in MBC and microbial functional diversity under high N treatment (N200) were mainly due to the significant decline of plant belowground biomass. This indicates that moderate fertilization is a better choice for grassland recovery and for maintaining high-level soil microbial community in N deficient ecosystems.

    9. Effects of Compost Addition on Pyrene Removal from Soil Cultivated with Three Selected Plant Species (pages 1222–1228)

      Alaà Ghanem, Valeria D'Orazio and Nicola Senesi

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200601

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      The authors investigated the effect of compost addition on the phytoremediation ability of Medicago sativa, Brassica napus, and Lolium perenne in soils contaminated with pyrene. The high partition coefficient of pyrene to compost dissolved organic matter (DOM) suggests its adsorption onto compost DOM. Compost might be a potential tool for remediation of contaminated soils, in addition to its amendment capacity.

    10. Fractionation of Ni, Cr and Cu from Soil by Sequential Extraction Procedure and Determination by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (pages 1229–1234)

      Sukran Akkus, Tulin Bal, Nagihan M. Karaaslan, Emre Yaman, Ersin Kilinc and Mehmet Yaman

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200711

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      Plants can easily uptake bio-available metals at mobile forms in soil phases. A sequential extraction method was employed to understand the mobility of metals through the simultaneous measurement by ICP-OES. The sum of the mobile percentages of metals was found to be higher than 50%.

    11. Effects of Lime-Based Waste Materials on Immobilization and Phytoavailability of Cadmium and Lead in Contaminated Soil (pages 1235–1241)

      Jung Eun Lim, Mahtab Ahmad, Sang Soo Lee, Christopher L. Shope, Yohey Hashimoto, Kwon-Rae Kim, Adel R. A. Usman, Jae E. Yang and Yong Sik Ok

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200169

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      Oyster shells and eggshells can be used as low cost lime-based amendments for immobilizing cadmium and lead in contaminated soils. TCLP test showed that the addition of waste materials effectively reduced the metal mobility. Phytoavailability tests indicated that the metal concentration in the shoots of maize plant was also reduced.

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