CLEAN – Soil, Air, Water

Cover image for Vol. 41 Issue 2

February 2013

Volume 41, Issue 2

Pages 107–209

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Research Articles
    6. Review
    7. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Clean Soil Air Water. 2/2013

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201390003

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Research Articles
    6. Review
    7. Research Articles
    1. Clean Soil Air Water. 2/2013

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201390004

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Research Articles
    6. Review
    7. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Clean Soil Air Water. 2/2013

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201390005

  4. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Research Articles
    6. Review
    7. Research Articles
    1. Identification and Apportionment of Sources of Ozone-forming Potential for Proper Reduction Strategies (pages 107–112)

      Selami Demir and Arslan Saral

      Version of Record online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100704

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      The results presented here clearly suggest that emissions related to paint use offer the highest potential for ozone formation. It can easily be concluded that biogenic emissions and traffic related emissions offer the highest risk for tropospheric ozone pollution in the study area.

    2. Dioxin Like Compounds Bulk Deposition on Corn (Zea mais) and Alfa Alfa (Medicago sativa): Modelled Levels on Derived Silage and Hay and Their Relevance for Dairy Production (pages 113–118)

      Gianfranco Brambilla, Stefania Paola De Filippis, Vittorio Esposito and Gaetano Settimo

      Version of Record online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100566

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      From the results of this study it can be concluded that for mais silage and alfa alfa hay production, air deposition may play a major role with respect to top soil contamination in determining a rise of PCDD, PCDF and DL-PCB background levels in dairy milk, due to plant density and height of their epigeal parts. The use of a ‘corn watch’ approach, where mais leaves may act as ‘bio-deposimeter’ may be envisaged also in terms of food and feed control, at farm level.

    3. The Impact of Geology of Recharge Areas on Groundwater Quality: A Case Study of Zhob River Basin, Pakistan (pages 119–127)

      Muhammad Umar, Amir Waseem, Muhammad Amjad Sabir, Akhtar Muhammad Kassi and Abdul Salam Khan

      Version of Record online: 10 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100581

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      Poor water quality is a major contributor toward economic loss as it refrains large scale uses of water in poverty elevation by putting a bar on public health, irrigation development, sustainable food production, and also limits its use in industrial and agriculture activities.

    4. Influence of Surfactants on Degradation of 1-(2-Chlorobenzoyl)-3-(4-chlorophenyl) Urea by Nanoscale Zerovalent Iron (pages 128–133)

      Qingxiang Zhou and Haiying Lin

      Version of Record online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100650

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      Among the various surfactants investigated, the anionic surfactant SDS at concentrations below the critical micelle concentration appeared to be most effective for the catalytic degradation of 1-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-3-(4-chlorophenyl) urea by nanoscale zerovalent iron: 99.7% removal.

    5. Fate of Pesticides and Their Transformation Products: First Flush Effects in a Semi-Arid Catchment (pages 134–142)

      Oliver Olsson, Miriam Khodorkovsky, Matthias Gassmann, Eran Friedler, Mandy Schneider and Yael Dubowski

      Version of Record online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100545

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      The study shows that the Hula Valley was an important source of pesticides and transformation products (TPs) at the Upper Jordan River basin and that substance flushing is extremely important for pesticides-monitoring campaigns.

    6. Factors Affecting UV/H2O2 Oxidation of 17α-Ethynyestradiol in Water (pages 143–147)

      Qingsong Li, Naiyun Gao, Yang Deng, Xiaoyan Ma and Wenhai Chu

      Version of Record online: 28 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100365

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      The results demonstrate that the described UV/H2O2 process is an effective method to control EE2 pollution in water. A removal efficiency of >99% could be achieved for EE2 under certain experimental conditions. The degradation of EE2 followed pseudo-first-order kinetics.

    7. Effect of Ozone and Ozone/Fenton in the Advanced Oxidation Process on Biodegradable Characteristics of Semi-aerobic Stabilized Leachate (pages 148–152)

      Salem S. Abu Amr, Hamidi Abdul Aziz, Mohd Nordin Adlan and Shuokr Qarani Aziz

      Version of Record online: 10 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200005

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      Effects of O3 and O3/H2O2/Fe2+ in the AOP on biodegradability and solubility of semi-aerobic stabilized solid waste leachate were investigated. The results suggest the application of biological treatment as a post-treatment process after the O3/H2O2/Fe2+ system in the AOP for semi-aerobic stabilized leachate.

    8. Assessment of Urban Source Metal Levels in Influent, Effluent, and Sludge of Two Municipal Biological Nutrient Removal Wastewater Treatment Plants of Bursa, an Industrial City in Turkey (pages 153–165)

      Nezih Kamil Salihoglu

      Version of Record online: 28 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100518

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      This study provides valuable information on the influent, effluent, and water soluble sludge metal levels of the treatment plants operated under five-stage Bardenpho® process and helps to predict the sources of the pollution, the treatment efficiency of the process and plants, and the behavior of the sludges when they are disposed.

    9. Biomonitoring of Ni and V Contamination Using Oysters (Saccostrea cucullata) at Lengeh Port, Persian Gulf, Iran (pages 166–173)

      Behnam Haidari, Alireza Riyahi Bakhtiari, Vhid Yavari, Ali Kazemi and Golshan Shirneshan

      Version of Record online: 28 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100564

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      The present study was accomplished to detect relationship among heavy metals (Ni and V) in surface sediment and their concentrations in soft and hard tissues of S. cucullata from intertidal zones of Lengeh port (Persian Gulf). S. cucullata can be recognized as a suitable biomonitoring agent for vanadium levels.

  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Research Articles
    6. Review
    7. Research Articles
    1. Another Important Factor of Rising Sea Level: Soil Erosion (pages 174–178)

      Ruibin Zhang, Jun He, Yanwen Zhao, Yao Peng and Li Fu

      Version of Record online: 10 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200127

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      The findings of this paper are that soil erosion is an important factor contributing to sea-level rise in addition to global warming. Sediment flow into rivers and oceans results in a large rise of relative sea level. The use of positive ecological protection measures to prevent soil erosion should not be underestimated in their contribution to the protection of marine and terrestrial environments.

  6. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Research Articles
    6. Review
    7. Research Articles
    1. Analyzing Effects of Shrub Canopy on Throughfall and Phreatic Water Using Water Isotopes, Western China (pages 179–184)

      Yuhong Liu, Zhen Xu, Fude Liu, Lixin Wang, Shuqing An and Shirong Liu

      Version of Record online: 10 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201200023

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      During the rainy season, water stable isotopic characteristics of precipitation approved that primary precipitation moisture in this region was originated from the Pacific Ocean. The shrub canopy had obvious effects on the processes of rainwater transmuted into throughfall.

    2. Co-composting of Municipal Solid Waste with Sawdust: Improving Compost Quality (pages 185–194)

      Javad Yousefi, Habibollah Younesi and Seyed Mahmoud Ghasempoury

      Version of Record online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100315

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      The results show that sawdust has beneficial effects on composting waste with high nitrogen content. All compost treatments reached thermophilic temperature rapidly, but the temperature of composting without sawdust showed fluctuations.

    3. Screening Indian Mustard Genotypes for Phytoremediating Arsenic-Contaminated Soils (pages 195–201)

      Mohd Kafeel Ahmad Ansari, Hong-Bo Shao, Shahid Umar, Altaf Ahmad, Shahid Hussain Ansari, Muhammad Iqbal and Gary Owens

      Version of Record online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100752

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      One of screened Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.) genotypes, Pusa Jai Kisan, had the ability to sustain growth in the presence of high As levels under hydroponic conditions. The amounts of As concentration in aerial parts of the plant point to the potential use of the Pusa Jai Kisan genotype in the remediation of As contaminated water supplies.

    4. Phytoremediation of Cadmium-Contaminated Soil by Two Jerusalem Artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) Genotypes (pages 202–209)

      Xiaohua Long, Ni Ni, Lin Wang, Xuheng Wang, Jinxing Wang, Zhenhua Zhang, Rengel Zed, Zhaopu Liu and Hongbo Shao

      Version of Record online: 28 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201100668

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      Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) can be used for soil phytoremediation via removal of heavy metal pollutants. The results imply that the Jerusalem artichoke genotypes NY2 and NY5 can extract more Cd than some hyperaccumulators, indicating to be better candidates.

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