CLEAN – Soil, Air, Water

Cover image for Vol. 42 Issue 2

Special Issue: Surface Water Management Using Sustainable Drainage – SUDS

February 2014

Volume 42, Issue 2

Pages 109–200

Issue edited by: S. Charlesworth, R. Wade

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Clean Soil Air Water. 2/2014

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201470011

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Research Articles
    1. Masthead: Clean Soil Air Water. 2/2014

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201470012

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Research Articles
    1. Contents: Clean Soil Air Water. 2/2014

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201470013

  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Research Articles
    1. Multiple benefits from surface water management– SUDS (pages 109–110)

      Rebecca Wade and Sue Charlesworth

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201470014

  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Research Articles
    1. Practical Review of Pervious Pavement Designs (pages 111–124)

      Jennifer Mullaney and Terry Lucke

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201300118

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The literature review showed that there is a lack of consensus between design guidelines as to whether or not a geofabric should be included between the aggregate layers of pervious pavements. The study concluded that the inclusion of a geofabric layer in the pavement structure may significantly decrease the infiltration rate of the pervious pavement system and could potentially reduce the structural integrity of the pervious pavement.

  6. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Research Articles
    1. Geotextile Incorporated Permeable Pavement System as Potential Source of Irrigation Water: Effects of Re-Used Water on the Soil, Plant Growth and Development (pages 125–132)

      Ernest O. Nnadi, Alan P. Newman and Stephen J. Coupe

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201300165

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Sustainable urban drainage system (SUDS) involves techniques, which deal with stormwater at source of rainfall and covers the three main elements of stormwater management, i.e. water quantity, water quality and amenity. The results show that pervious pavement system treated and stored storm water could be used as irrigation water that can support growth and development of both edible and non-edible plants.

    2. Utilization of Glyphosate-Containing Herbicides on Pervious Paving Systems: Laboratory-Based Experiments to Determine Impacts on Effluent Water Quality (pages 133–138)

      Susanne M. Charlesworth, Fredrick U. Mbanaso, Stephen J. Coupe and Ernest O. Nnadi

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201300157

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Addition of increasing concentrations of glyphosate containing herbicide to the surface of a porous pavement system (PPS) to which oil had been applied resulted in the release of increasing concentrations of heavy metals and hydrocarbons (HC) in the effluent of PPS model rigs with time. The increase in turbidity and decrease in pH, in combination with the action of the surfactant in the glyphosate formulation, may together explain the mechanism for metal and HC release.

    3. Infiltration Behaviour of Polymer-Modified Porous Concrete and Porous Asphalt Surfaces used in SuDS Techniques (pages 139–145)

      Luis A. Sañudo-Fontaneda, Jorge Rodriguez-Hernandez, Miguel A. Calzada-Pérez and Daniel Castro-Fresno

      Article first published online: 17 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201300156

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Porous concrete and porous asphalt are most widely used surfaces into a permeable pavement structure for source control in sustainable drainage systems (SuDS) techniques. A comprehensive laboratory methodology is developed for the analysis of the impact of topographical variables on the infiltration behaviour of these porous surfaces under different clogging levels.

    4. Effect of Age of Permeable Pavements on Their Infiltration Function (pages 146–152)

      Floris Boogaard, Terry Lucke and Simon Beecham

      Article first published online: 11 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201300113

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The infiltration capacities of 55 permeable pavement systems installed in the Netherlands and in Australia are compared in terms of their ability to infiltrate a 3-month average recurrence interval storm event in case of the study has shown that the performance of the clogged permeable pavement systems was still generally acceptable, even after many years in service.

    5. Sustainable Urban Drainage System Modeling for Managing Urban Surface Water Flood Risk (pages 153–159)

      J. Bryan Ellis and Christophe Viavattene

      Article first published online: 17 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201300225

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Accurate identification of critical drainage areas subject to pluvial flooding requires geographic information system (GIS)-based 1D (sewer)–2D (surface) modeling with terrestrial LiDAR survey to define surface micro-topography. The development of flood mitigating approaches demands the selection and location of appropriate sustainable drainage systems as evidenced by the SUDSLOC model and its GIS-based decision-support framework.

    6. Modeling Heavy Metal Behavior in Sustainable Drainage Systems: A Case Study (pages 160–168)

      Ruth Quinn and Alejandro Dussaillant J.

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201300163

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This paper presents, a model which predicts the behavior of heavy metals in rain gardens which is applied to the design of a proposed facility. The model results show that large levels of lead accumulation occur in the upper layers of the system and in all cases examined no heavy metal transfer to groundwater is observed. Macropore flow did not result in heavy metal seepage from the facility.

    7. Fate and Behavior of Pollutants in a Vegetated Pond System for Road Runoff (pages 169–177)

      Georgios Roinas, Alexandros Tsavdaris, John B. Williams and Catherine Mant

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201300159

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This paper reports on monitoring of a range of pollutants in a runoff pond in the UK planted with reeds. The problem highlighted is that these systems are very dynamic and different pollutants (e.g., metals and hydrocarbons) behave in different ways. Better understanding of how pollutants are removed will therefore enable us to refine designs of future SuDS.

    8. SuDS Efficiency during the Start-Up Period under Mediterranean Climatic Conditions (pages 178–186)

      Sara Perales-Momparler, Carmen Hernández-Crespo, Francisco Vallés-Morán, Miguel Martín, Ignacio Andrés-Doménech, Joaquín Andreu Álvarez and Chris Jefferies

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201300164

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Full flow monitoring was undertaken in Xàtiva, Spain, and spot samples were taken from two roadside swales, one detention basin and one green roof to give a preliminary assessment of water quality performance. The preliminary results demonstrate the effectiveness of the systems under typical Mediterranean conditions.

    9. Deconstructing the Sustainable Drainage Management Train in Terms of Water Quantity – Preliminary Results for Coventry, UK (pages 187–192)

      Craig Lashford, Sue Charlesworth, Frank Warwick and Matthew Blackett

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201300161

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Sustainable drainage management trains are a system whereby a combination of sustainable drainage devices are linked to provide extra resilience to reduce water quantity. A series of simulations using WinDes® drainage software acknowledge that varying arrangements of devices provide differing levels of reduction. Detention ponds consistently reduce runoff more effectively than other devices.

    10. Invertebrate Communities and Environmental Conditions in a Series of Urban Drainage Ponds in Eastern Scotland: Implications for Biodiversity and Conservation Value of SUDS (pages 193–200)

      Robert A. Briers

      Article first published online: 11 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/clen.201300162

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Invertebrate communities of urban drainage ponds in Scotland were influenced by average environmental conditions and temporal variability, particularly soluble reactive phosphorus, and dissolved oxygen levels. Over a 5-year period, communities in different sites became more dissimilar in response to environmental changes and also showed a reduction in species richness, questioning the biodiversity potential of such sites in the longer term.

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