ChemMedChem

Cover image for Vol. 6 Issue 12

December 9, 2011

Volume 6, Issue 12

Pages 2113–2327

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlight
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Urolithin as a Converging Scaffold Linking Ellagic acid and Coumarin Analogues: Design of Potent Protein Kinase CK2 Inhibitors (ChemMedChem 12/2011) (page 2113)

      Dr. Giorgio Cozza, Dr. Alessandra Gianoncelli, Dr. Paolo Bonvini, Dr. Elisa Zorzi, Dr. Riccardo Pasquale, Prof. Angelo Rosolen, Prof.Dr. Lorenzo A. Pinna, Prof. Dr. Flavio Meggio, Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Zagotto and Prof. Dr. Stefano Moro

      Version of Record online: 2 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201190052

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      The cover picture shows the hypothetical binding motif of a novel potent protein kinase CK2 inhibitor, 4-bromo-3,8-dihydroxy-benzo[c]chromen-6-one, which shows a Ki value of 7 nM. CK2 is a ubiquitous, essential, and highly pleiotropic protein kinase, and abnormally high constitutive activity of this enzyme is thought to mediate its pathogenic potential in neoplasia and other diseases, such as viral infections and inflammatory diseases, like glomerulonephritis. Starting from the previous identification of highly active 3,8-dibromo-7-hydroxy-4-methylchromen-2-one and ellagic acid (Ki=20 nM and 60 nM, respectively), an X-ray-driven “cut & paste approach” was applied to design a novel series of urolithins as potent CK2 inhibitors. For more details, see the Full Paper by Stefano Moro et al. on p. 2273 ff.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlight
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: A Heterodimeric Glucuronide Prodrug for Cancer Tritherapy: the Double Role of the Chemical Amplifier (ChemMedChem 12/2011) (page 2114)

      Dr. Marion Grinda, Dr. Jonathan Clarhaut, Dr. Isabelle Tranoy-Opalinski, Dr. Brigitte Renoux, Dr. Arnaud Monvoisin, Dr. Laurent Cronier and Dr. Sébastien Papot

      Version of Record online: 2 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201190053

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      The inside cover picture shows a nontoxic targeting system programmed for the selective delivery of three different cytotoxic agents to the tumor site. This system includes a chemical amplifier that transforms a single tumor-associated enzymatic triggering event into the release of a highly toxic drug cocktail. For more details, see the Communication by Sébastien Papot et al. on p. 2137 ff.

  3. Graphical Abstract

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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
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    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
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  4. Corrigendum

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    5. Corrigendum
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      Corrigendum: The Discovery of Compounds That Stimulate the Activity of Kallikrein-Related Peptidase 3 (KLK3) (page 2123)

      Henna H. Härkönen, Dr. Johanna M. Mattsson, Dr. Juha A. E. Määttä, Prof. Ulf-Håkan Stenman, Dr. Hannu Koistinen, Dr. Sanni Matero, Dr. Björn Windshügel, Prof. Antti Poso and Dr. Maija Lahtela-Kakkonen

      Version of Record online: 2 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100461

      This article corrects:

      The Discovery of Compounds That Stimulate the Activity of Kallikrein-Related Peptidase 3 (KLK3)

      Vol. 6, Issue 12, 2170–2178, Version of Record online: 27 SEP 2011

  5. News

    1. Top of page
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    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
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    8. Highlight
    9. Communications
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    11. Book Reviews
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  6. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
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    1. J. Bajorath (page 2131)

      Version of Record online: 2 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100415

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      “The biggest challenge facing the drug discovery community is … to come up with sustainable business models that will ensure a future for innovative pharmaceutical research and deliver drugs.” This and more from Prof. Jürgen Bajorath can be found on page 2131.

  7. Highlight

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
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    7. Author Profile
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    9. Communications
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    1. Curaxins: A New Family of Non-genotoxic Multitargeted Anticancer Agents (pages 2133–2136)

      Dr. Valeria Di Bussolo and Prof. Dr. Filippo Minutolo

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100476

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      As a matter of FACT! Carbazoles known as curaxins effectively bind the heterodimeric protein complex, FACT, the sequestration of which causes promotion of multiple pathways (p53 activation and NF-κB inhibition) leading to tumor cell death, without inducing DNA damage. Given these results, curaxins hold promise for the development of effective anticancer therapies with decreased toxicity.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlight
    9. Communications
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    11. Book Reviews
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    1. A Heterodimeric Glucuronide Prodrug for Cancer Tritherapy: the Double Role of the Chemical Amplifier (pages 2137–2141)

      Dr. Marion Grinda, Dr. Jonathan Clarhaut, Dr. Isabelle Tranoy-Opalinski, Dr. Brigitte Renoux, Dr. Arnaud Monvoisin, Dr. Laurent Cronier and Dr. Sébastien Papot

      Version of Record online: 3 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100355

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      Amplified action! We developed the therapeutic first targeting system that includes a chemical amplifier programmed both to release two potent anticancer drugs after a single enzymatic activation step and become cytotoxic itself once the amplification process is completed.

    2. From Catalysts to Bioactive Organometallics: Do Grubbs Catalysts Trigger Biological Effects? (pages 2142–2145)

      Luciano Oehninger, Dr. Hamed Alborzinia, Stephanie Ludewig, Prof. Dr. Knut Baumann, Prof. Dr. Stefan Wölfl and Prof. Dr. Ingo Ott

      Version of Record online: 7 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100308

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      Grubbs up! Grubbs-type catalysts have potential as inhibitors of tumor-relevant enzymes, exhibit antiproliferative effects in cultured tumor cells, and influence cell metabolism. While the potencies of these catalysts are poor to moderate from a drug development prospective, their biological activity suggests that incorporating aspects of their structures could be beneficial for drug design.

    3. Complementary Screening Techniques Yielded Fragments that Inhibit the Phosphatase Activity of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase (pages 2146–2149)

      Steffen Hahn, Janosch Achenbach, Estella Buscató, Franca-Maria Klingler, Mirjam Schroeder, Karin Meirer, Martina Hieke, Jan Heering, Dr. Eduardo Barbosa-Sicard, Dr. Frank Loehr, Prof. Dr. Ingrid Fleming, Prof. Dr. Volker Doetsch, Prof. Dr. Manfred Schubert-Zsilavecz, Prof. Dr. Dieter Steinhilber and Prof. Dr. Ewgenij Proschak

      Version of Record online: 21 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100433

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      A combination of three methods—molecular docking (virtual screening), saturation transfer difference (STD)-NMR screening, and a fluorescence-based activity assay—were used to screen a fragment library for potential lead fragments displaying inhibition of the phosphatase activity of soluble epoxide hydrolase, an enzyme involved in pathophysiologically relevant processes, including proliferation and apoptosis.

    4. Activity Profile Sequences: a Concept to Account for the Progression of Compound Activity in Target Space and to Extract SAR Information from Analogue Series with Multiple Target Annotations (pages 2150–2154)

      Dr. Ye Hu and Prof. Dr. Jürgen Bajorath

      Version of Record online: 3 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100395

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      Progression of compound activity in target space: We introduce the concept of activity profile sequences to organize compound series into sets of structures active against stepwise increasing numbers of targets. Shown is an exemplary sequence containing a conserved scaffold representing compounds with activity against up to four targets (A–D).

    5. An Old NSAID Revisited: Crystal Structure of Aldose Reductase in Complex with Sulindac at 1.0 Å Supports a Novel Mechanism for its Anticancer and Antiproliferative Effects (pages 2155–2157)

      Dr. Holger Steuber

      Version of Record online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100374

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      An old dog with new tricks! While sulindac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), has been extensively investigated as an anticancer agent, its mechanism of action remains poorly understood. The crystal structure of aldose reductase (ALR) in complex with sulindac rationalizes its inhibition of this enzyme—formerly considered an antidiabetic target—as a key mechanism for antitumor activity and supports further evaluation of ALR inhibitors as anticancer and antiproliferative drugs.

  9. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlight
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Book Reviews
    12. Preview
    1. Structure-Based Discovery of Allosteric Modulators of Two Related Class B G-Protein-Coupled Receptors (pages 2159–2169)

      Dr. Chris de Graaf, Dr. Chantal Rein, Dr. David Piwnica, Dr. Fabrizio Giordanetto and Dr. Didier Rognan

      Version of Record online: 12 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100317

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      Virtual reality: Although crystallographic structure data and related information have been reported for class A GPCRs, herein we report the first use of structure-based virtual screening to identify new allosteric modulators of class B GPCRs. Despite the modest activities of the identified compounds, this study provides a novel in silico approach for the discovery of future class B GPCR modulators.

    2. The Discovery of Compounds That Stimulate the Activity of Kallikrein-Related Peptidase 3 (KLK3) (pages 2170–2178)

      Henna H. Härkönen, Dr. Johanna M. Mattsson, Dr. Juha A. E. Määttä, Prof. Ulf-Håkan Stenman, Dr. Hannu Koistinen, Dr. Sanni Matero, Dr. Björn Windshügel, Prof. Antti Poso and Dr. Maija Lahtela-Kakkonen

      Version of Record online: 27 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100349

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      Target specificity: Successful 3D pharmacophore-based virtual screening resulted in the first small, drug-like molecule that stimulates the activity of kallikrein-related peptidase 3 (KLK3, PSA). The compound discovered can be applied to the design of novel KLK3-stimulating compounds with the potential to inhibit tumor angiogenesis and progression of prostate cancer.

    3. B-Ring-Modified isoCombretastatin A-4 Analogues Endowed with Interesting Anticancer Activities (pages 2179–2191)

      Dr. Abdallah Hamze, Evelia Rasolofonjatovo, Dr. Olivier Provot, Dr. Céline Mousset, Damien Veau, Dr. Jordi Rodrigo, Dr. Jérôme Bignon, Dr. Jian-Miao Liu, Dr. Joanna Wdzieczak-Bakala, Dr. Sylviane Thoret, Dr. Joëlle Dubois, Prof. Jean-Daniel Brion and Dr. Mouad Alami

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100325

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      C3′ is prime: In our continued efforts to optimize the isoCA-4 skeleton, we synthesized and evaluated a new series of 1,1-diaryl compounds in which the 3′-hydroxy group of isoCA-4 is replaced by various substituents. Compounds 8 and 17, respectively bearing allylic and propargylic alcohol functions at C3′, were found to have the most potent antiproliferative activity against a panel of cancer cell lines at the nanomolar level.

    4. Modulation of the Biological Activity of microRNA-210 with Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNAs) (pages 2192–2202)

      Dr. Enrica Fabbri, Alex Manicardi, Dr. Tullia Tedeschi, Prof. Stefano Sforza, Dr. Nicoletta Bianchi, Eleonora Brognara, Dr. Alessia Finotti, Dr. Giulia Breveglieri, Dr. Monica Borgatti, Prof. Roberto Corradini, Prof. Rosangela Marchelli and Prof. Roberto Gambari

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100270

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      R8-conjugated PNAs for uptake! A polyarginine–PNA conjugate that targets microRNA-210 (Rpep-PNA-a210, or miR-210) shows high affinity for RNA, efficient uptake into target cells without the need for transfection reagents, and potent inhibitory effects toward the biological activity of microRNA-210.

    5. Docking Analysis and Resistance Evaluation of Clinically Relevant Mutations Associated with the HIV-1 Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors Nevirapine, Efavirenz and Etravirine (pages 2203–2213)

      Prof. Stefano Alcaro, Dr. Claudia Alteri, Dr. Anna Artese, Dr. Francesca Ceccherini-Silberstein, Dr. Giosuè Costa, Dr. Francesco Ortuso, Ada Bertoli, Dr. Federica Forbici, Maria Mercedes Santoro, Dr. Lucia Parrotta, Dr. Philippe Flandre, Dr. Bernard Masquelier, Prof. Diane Descamps, Prof. Vincent Calvez, Prof. Anne-Genevieve Marcelin, Prof. Carlo Federico Perno, Dr. Tobias Sing and Dr. Valentina Svicher

      Version of Record online: 27 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100362

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      Mutations that cause resistance to NNRTIs and treatment failure in patients were analyzed by means of computational and statistical methods. Data for first- and second-generation NNRTIs related to the single RT mutation K103N were in agreement with the unfavorable energetic profile observed with respect to the wild-type sequence. Interestingly, according to the phenotypic profile, the increased affinity for K103N/S mutants displayed by the potent agent diarylpirimidine etravirine was characterized by high conformational flexibility.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Identification of Inhibitors of the Leishmania cdc2-Related Protein Kinase CRK3 (pages 2214–2224)

      Dr. Laura A. T. Cleghorn, Dr. Andrew Woodland, Iain T. Collie, Dr. Leah S. Torrie, Dr. Neil Norcross, Dr. Torsten Luksch, Dr. Chido Mpamhanga, Roderick G. Walker, Prof. Jeremy C. Mottram, Dr. Ruth Brenk, Prof. Julie A. Frearson, Prof. Ian H. Gilbert and Prof. Paul G. Wyatt

      Version of Record online: 13 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100344

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      Selective at last: [1,2,4]Triazolo[1,5-a]pyridines, aminopyrazoles, and disubstituted ureas were explored as potent and parasite-selective inhibitors of an enzymatic Leishmania CRK3–cyclin 6 complex. Optimisation of these series using classical SAR studies afforded low-nanomolar CRK3 inhibitors with significant selectivity over the closely related human cyclin-dependent kinase CDK2.

    7. Synthesis and Anti-HIV Activity of Aryl-2-[(4-cyanophenyl)amino]-4-pyrimidinone hydrazones as Potent Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (pages 2225–2232)

      Dr. Xiao-Dong Ma, Shi-Qiong Yang, Shuang-Xi Gu, Qiu-Qin He, Prof. Fen-Er Chen, Prof. Erik De Clercq, Prof. Jan Balzarini and Prof. Christophe Pannecouque

      Version of Record online: 8 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100334

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      Antiviral agents: A series of new diarylpyrimidine (DAPY) derivatives with a ketone hydrazine substituent on the CH2 linker between the pyrimidine nucleus and the phenyl ring were synthesized, and their anti-HIV activity in MT-4 cells was evaluated. Most compounds of this class exhibited excellent activity against wild-type HIV-1, with EC50 values in the range of 1.7–13.2 nM.

    8. New Prodrugs of the Antiprotozoal Drug Pentamidine (pages 2233–2242)

      Dr. Joscha Kotthaus, Dr. Jürke Kotthaus, Dr. Dennis Schade, Dr. Ulrike Schwering, Dr. Helen Hungeling, Dr. Helge Müller-Fielitz, Prof. Dr. Walter Raasch and Prof. Dr. Bernd Clement

      Version of Record online: 7 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100422

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      Weighing the pros and cons: The systematic development and characterisation of novel prodrugs of the antiprotozoal drug pentamidine is described. The prodrug principles applied use different enzyme systems for activation and target both passive and active uptake mechanisms. Through the synthesis and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of eight novel prodrugs, reliable conclusions regarding the most appropriate prodrug principle for this drug were drawn.

    9. Evaluation of 4,5-Disubstituted-2-Aminoimidazole–Triazole Conjugates for Antibiofilm/Antibiotic Resensitization Activity Against MRSA and Acinetobacter baumannii (pages 2243–2251)

      Zhaoming Su, Dr. Lingling Peng, Dr. Roberta J. Worthington and Prof. Dr. Christian Melander

      Version of Record online: 16 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100316

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      Fight against the film: 4,5-Disubstituted-2-aminoimidazole–triazole conjugates (2-AITs) were developed and investigated for antibiofilm activity and antibiotic resensitization. This class of small molecules was found to inhibit biofilm formation by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Acinetobacter baumannii at micromolar concentrations. Conventional antibiotic resensitization was also observed for lead compounds.

    10. 4-Substituted Thioquinolines and Thiazoloquinolines: Potent, Selective, and Tween-80 in vitro Dependent Families of Antitubercular Agents with Moderate in vivo Activity (pages 2252–2263)

      Dr. Jaime Escribano, Cristina Rivero-Hernández, Hilda Rivera, Dr. David Barros, Dr. Julia Castro-Pichel, Dr. Esther Pérez-Herrán, Dr. Alfonso Mendoza-Losana, Dr. Íñigo Angulo-Barturen, Dr. Santiago Ferrer-Bazaga, Dr. Elena Jiménez-Navarro and Dr. Lluís Ballell

      Version of Record online: 16 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100309

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      Two new families: In this work we identified two new classes of potent antitubercular agents. Synthesis and analysis of the pharmacological properties of several analogues led to the discovery of potent and selective derivatives in vitro, with moderate in vivo activity.

    11. Development of Isoxazoline-Containing Peptidomimetics as Dual αvβ3 and α5β1 Integrin Ligands (pages 2264–2272)

      Dr. Alessandra Tolomelli, Prof. Luca Gentilucci, Dr. Elisa Mosconi, Dr. Angelo Viola, Dr. Samantha Deianira Dattoli, Dr. Monica Baiula, Prof. Santi Spampinato, Dr. Laura Belvisi and Dr. Monica Civera

      Version of Record online: 26 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100372

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      Molecular copycats! Isoxazoline-containing peptidomimetics, designed to be effective αvβ3 and α5β1 integrin ligands, were synthesized by hydroxyamine conjugate addition to alkylidene acetoacetates followed by intramolecular hemiketalization. Cell adhesion assay results suggest a very effective ligand–receptor interaction, as confirmed by docking studies.

    12. Urolithin as a Converging Scaffold Linking Ellagic acid and Coumarin Analogues: Design of Potent Protein Kinase CK2 Inhibitors (pages 2273–2286)

      Dr. Giorgio Cozza, Dr. Alessandra Gianoncelli, Dr. Paolo Bonvini, Dr. Elisa Zorzi, Dr. Riccardo Pasquale, Prof. Angelo Rosolen, Prof.Dr. Lorenzo A. Pinna, Prof. Dr. Flavio Meggio, Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Zagotto and Prof. Dr. Stefano Moro

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100338

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      Two become one: Comparing the crystallographic binding modes of ellagic acid (red) and 3,8-dibromo-7-hydroxy-4-methylchromen-2-one (DBC; blue), an X-ray structure-driven merging approach to the design of novel casein kinase 2 (CK2) inhibitors was taken. Using this strategy, a potent and selective urolithin derivative, 4-bromo-3,8-dihydroxy-benzo[c]chromen-6-one was identified, which exhibits a Ki value of 7 nM against CK2.

    13. Evaluation of Platinum–Ethacrynic Acid Conjugates in the Treatment of Mesothelioma (pages 2287–2293)

      Dr. Ilaria Zanellato, Dr. Ilaria Bonarrigo, Dr. Manuele Sardi, Dr. Manuela Alessio, Dr. Elisabetta Gabano, Prof. Mauro Ravera and Prof. Domenico Osella

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100426

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      Fighting firewithfire: Malignant pleural mesothelioma cells are chemoresistant thanks to glutathione (GSH), which deactivates Pt-based drugs. Ethacrynic acid (EA) inhibits the enzyme that catalyzes the conjugation between GSH and Pt drugs. We therefore synthesized and characterized a bifunctional drug—a PtII complex containing EA—and tested it on four mesothelioma cell lines in comparison with its analogue PtIV complex, ethacraplatin.

    14. Novel Rhein Analogues as Potential Anticancer Agents (pages 2294–2301)

      Dr. Xiaochuan Yang, Dr. Guojing Sun, Dr. Chunhao Yang and Prof. Binghe Wang

      Version of Record online: 26 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100384

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      Paddling the Rhein: Two series of rhein analogues were synthesized with modification at the 3-position. Their cytotoxicities were evaluated using an MTT assay, and among all analogues, 8 showed the best potency, with an IC50 value of 0.6 μM against the MOLT4 cell line.

    15. Substructure-Based Virtual Screening for Adenosine A2A Receptor Ligands (pages 2302–2311)

      Eelke van der Horst, Rianne van der Pijl, Thea Mulder-Krieger, Dr. Andreas Bender and Prof. Adriaan P. IJzerman

      Version of Record online: 21 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100369

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      Fragmentized! After developing and applying a graph-based approach to “frequent substructure” mining, we performed a virtual screen on the adenosine A2A receptor and retrieved active compounds from vendor databases. The compound shown here displayed a Ki value on the A2A receptor of 770 nM.

    16. Pyrolo[1,2:4,5]-1,4-dioxopyrazino[1,2:1,6]pyrido[3,4-b]indoles: A Group of Urokinase Inhibitors, their Synthesis, and Stereochemistry-Dependent Activity (pages 2312–2322)

      Dr. Jiawang Liu, Dr. Yuji Wang, Yifan Yang, Dr. Xueyun Jiang, Prof. Dr. Ming Zhao, Wenjing Wang, Dr. Guofeng Wu, Dr. Jianhui Wu, Meiqing Zheng and Prof. Dr. Shiqi Peng

      Version of Record online: 23 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100345

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      Stop the clot: Small molecular antifibrinolytic agents in clinical use such as tranexamic acid carry the risk of prompting thrombus formation. Herein we present an investigation of pyrolo[1,2:4,5]-1,4-dioxopyrazino[1,2:1,6]pyrido[3,4-b]indoles (DAPPP), some of which show strong hemostatic activities in vivo. The most potent compound, 5 c, has a good therapeutic window for antifibrinolytic therapy.

  10. Book Reviews

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    1. Targeted Delivery of Small and Macromolecular Drugs. Edited by Ajit S. Narang and Ram I. Mahato. (pages 2323–2325)

      Prof. Paolo Caliceti

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100352

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      CRC Press, Boca Raton 2010. 630 pp., hardcover $ 99.95.—ISBN 978-1-4200-8772-7

    2. Protein Kinases as Drug Targets. Edited by Bert Klebl, Gerhard Müller and Michael Hamacher. (pages 2325–2326)

      Dr. Matthias Dreyer

      Version of Record online: 29 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201100386

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      Wiley-VCH, Weinheim 2011, 396 pp., hardcover $ 190.00.—ISBN 978-3-527-31790-5

  11. Preview

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    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemMedChem 1/2012 (page 2327)

      Version of Record online: 2 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201190056

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