Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging

Cover image for Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging

May/June 2007

Volume 2, Issue 3

Pages 113–161

  1. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Full Papers
    3. Short Communications
    4. Current Awareness
    5. Errata
    1. Evaluation of tumor affinity of mono-[123I]iodohypericin and mono-[123I]iodoprotohypericin in a mouse model with a RIF-1 tumor (pages 113–119)

      Humphrey Fonge, Marie Van de Putte, Dieter Huyghe, Guy Bormans, Yicheng Ni, Peter de Witte and Alfons Verbruggen

      Article first published online: 4 JUN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.136

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The study describes the evaluation of iodine-123 labeled hypericin (mono-[123I]iodohypericin) and its precursor mono-[123I] iodoprotohypericin in a mouse RIF-1 tumor model. Tumor uptake of mono-[123I]iodohypericin was slightly higher than that of mono-[123I]iodoprotohypericin and reached 3.8% of injected dose/g at 24 h post injection but this difference was not statistically significant (P  0.05). Mono-[123I]iodohypericin has the more favorable imaging characteristics in view of its faster clearance from non target tissues.

    2. Magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerosis by targeting extracellular matrix deposition with Gadofluorine M (pages 120–129)

      Jörg Meding, Matthias Urich, Kai Licha, Michael Reinhardt, Bernd Misselwitz, Zahi A. Fayad and Hanns-Joachim Weinmann

      Article first published online: 7 JUN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.137

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Gadofluorine M-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging clearly demarcates atherosclerotic plaques from the normal vessel wall [(a) MRI, (b) corresponding histology]. In this study, the underlying mechanism of this plaque-specific accumulation has been clarified. Gadofluorine M binds hydrophobically to extracellular matrix components within the fibrous regions of atherosclerotic plaques.

    3. Dual-modality in vivo monitoring of subventricular zone stem cell migration and metabolism (pages 130–138)

      Francesca Cicchetti, Robert E. Gross, Jeff W.M. Bulte, Mary Owen, Iris Chen, Martine Saint-Pierre, Xukui Wang, Meixiang Yu and Anna-Liisa Brownell

      Article first published online: 22 JUN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.138

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      MRI studies showed minimal trafficking of the rat subventricular zone stem cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles after transplantation into the rat striatum, while after transplantation into the rostral migratory stream (RMS) they migrated into the olfactory bulb. PET studies showed stem cell transplantation induced functional enhancement in the host after striatal transplantation and minor changes after RMS transplantation. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the importance of in vivo imaging studies to investigate fate and function of transplanted stem cells.

    4. Gadofullerenes as nanoscale magnetic labels for cellular MRI (pages 139–146)

      Balaji Sitharaman, Lesa A. Tran, Quynh P. Pham, Robert D. Bolskar, Raja Muthupillai, Scott D. Flamm, Antonios G. Mikos and Lon J. Wilson

      Article first published online: 22 JUN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.140

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this study, anionic gadofullerene (Gd@C60[C(COOH)2]10) was used as an in vitro cellular magnetic resonance imaging label. Excellent labeling efficiency (98–100%) was achieved without a transfecting agent and the average uptake was up to 133.6 ± 5.5 pg Gd per cell or 1011 Gd3+ ions per cell. A clinical MRI imager at 1.5 T showed that signal intensity on the T1-weighted MR images was 250% greater in labeled cells.

  2. Short Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Full Papers
    3. Short Communications
    4. Current Awareness
    5. Errata
    1. Antibody-mediated cell labeling of peripheral T cells with micron-sized iron oxide particles (MPIOs) allows single cell detection by MRI (pages 147–153)

      Erik M. Shapiro, Laura N. Medford-Davis, Tarek M. Fahmy, Cynthia E. Dunbar and Alan P. Koretsky

      Article first published online: 31 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.134

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Peripheral T cells were labeled in vitro in whole blood with micron sized iron oxide particles. Specificity was accomplished with anti-CD5antibodies and a biotin/streptavidin bridge. Iron contents as high as 60 pg iron per cell enabled in vitro single cell detection by MRI.

  3. Current Awareness

    1. Top of page
    2. Full Papers
    3. Short Communications
    4. Current Awareness
    5. Errata
    1. You have free access to this content
  4. Errata

    1. Top of page
    2. Full Papers
    3. Short Communications
    4. Current Awareness
    5. Errata
    1. You have free access to this content

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