Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging

Cover image for Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging

November/December 2010

Volume 5, Issue 6

Pages 305–355

  1. How To

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    1. How to measure the transmetallation of a gadolinium complex (pages 305–308)

      S. Laurent, L. Vander Elst, C. Henoumont and R. N. Muller

      Version of Record online: 27 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.388

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A simple method to study the stability of Gd complexes through the evolution of the paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation rate of water protons at 37°C has been described.

  2. Full Papers

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    1. Design and characterization of a polymeric MRI contrast agent based on PVA for in vivo living-cell tracking (pages 309–317)

      Yoichi Tachibana, Jun-ichiro Enmi, Atsushi Mahara, Hidehiro Iida and Tetsuji Yamaoka

      Version of Record online: 27 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.389

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The intracellular delivery system of Gd–PVA was established using an electroporation system, and the cytotoxicity, intracellular stability, body distribution and MR-imaging ability of the contrast agent were studied in vitro and in vivo. These results indicate that Gd–PVA can visualize only living cells in vivo for a long period of time even at the deep area of large animal bodies.

    2. NMR relaxation and magnetic properties of superparamagnetic nanoworms (pages 318–322)

      Yves Gossuin, Sabrina Disch, Quoc L. Vuong, Pierre Gillis, Raphaël P. Hermann, Ji-Ho Park and Michael J. Sailor

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.387

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this work, the magnetic and NMR relaxation properties of linear clusters of maghemite particles – called nanoworms – are studied. After the usual saturation, the magnetization of the worms is still increasing, which results in an appreciable increase in the transverse relaxivity at high magnetic fields. The transverse relaxation of the worms is more efficient than for the isolated grains, which is confirmed by computer simulations. The nanoworms thus constitute a promising T2 agent for cellular and molecular imaging.

    3. Surrogate MR markers of response to chemo- or radiotherapy in association with co-treatments: a retrospective analysis of multi-modal studies (pages 323–332)

      Bénédicte F. Jordan and Bernard Gallez

      Version of Record online: 21 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.397

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The aim of the work is to predict and monitor the efficacy of cotreatments to radio- and chemotherapy by noninvasive MR imaging. Ten different co-treatments were involved in this retrospective analysis in which eight MR-derived parameters (markers) were tested for their ability to predict therapeutic outcome (factor of increase in regrowth delay) in experimental tumor models after radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. The parameters were: tumor pO2 and O2 consumption rate (using EPR oximetry); tumor blood flow and permeability, i.e. Vp, Ktrans, Kep and percentage of perfused vessels (using DCE-MRI); and BOLD signal intensity and Rmath image (using functional MRI). This multi-modal comparison of co-treatment efficacy pointed out the limitations of each MR marker and identifies in vivo pO2 and DCE parameters (Vp and Kep) as relevant endpoints for radiation therapy and chemotherapy, respectively. This study can help to qualify relevant imaging endpoints in the preclinical setting of cancer therapy.

  3. Abstracts

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  4. Current Awareness

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