Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging

Cover image for Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging

January/February 2010

Volume 5, Issue 1

Pages 1–51

  1. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Full Papers
    3. Short Communications
    4. Current Awareness
    1. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of activatable target specific molecular probes (pages 1–8)

      Raphael Alford, Mikako Ogawa, Moinuddin Hassan, Amir H. Gandjbakhche, Peter L. Choyke and Hisataka Kobayashi

      Article first published online: 26 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.360

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      A targeted molecular probe is demonstrated which reports cellular internalization through change in fluorescence lifetime.

    2. Pharmacokinetics of contrast agents targeted to the tumor vasculature in molecular magnetic resonance imaging (pages 9–17)

      Marlies Oostendorp, Kim Douma, Tilman M. Hackeng, Marc A. M. J. van Zandvoort, Mark J. Post and Walter H. Backes

      Article first published online: 26 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.361

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The pharmacokinetic behavior and tumor penetration of a molecular MRI contrast agent targeted to angiogenic tumor vessels were investigated using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and pharmacokinetic modeling. The combination of a targeted contrast agent, a dynamic imaging protocol, and pharmacokinetic modeling provided unique information to determine contrast agent delivery and angiogenic activity in tumors.

    3. MR molecular imaging of HER-2 in a murine tumor xenograft by SPIO labeling of anti-HER-2 affibody (pages 18–22)

      Manabu Kinoshita, Yoshichika Yoshioka, Yoshiko Okita, Naoya Hashimoto and Toshiki Yoshimine

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.363

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      This research demonstrates the possibility of target specific MR-molecular imaging by use of Affibody and SPIO. Figure B shows HER-2 specific accumulation of SPIO in a murine tumor xenograft model by use of anti-HER-2 Affibody with biotine-streptavidin linkage. Quantified MR signal intensity at the tumor shows decrease of the signal intensity after Affibody and SPIO injection (C).

    4. Quantitative analysis of dynamic MRI data obtained with a hollow fibre module (pages 23–33)

      Jean-Luc Dimicoli

      Article first published online: 22 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.365

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      The paper presents a model describing the diffusion of water and contrast agent (CA) in hollow fibre modules (HFM) and which is able to calculate the contribution of water exchange to the parameters resulting from dynamic R1 relaxation data. The results show that neglecting the water exchange rate between intra and extra-fibre spaces leads to an excessive CA extravasation rate and a too small intra-fibre volume. Lastly experimental results suggest that diffusion rather than molecular weight define HFM membrane cut-off.

  2. Short Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Full Papers
    3. Short Communications
    4. Current Awareness
    1. Serine-derivatized gadonanotubes as magnetic nanoprobes for intracellular labeling (pages 34–38)

      Amy A. Hassan, Bonita Tak-Yee Chan, Lesa A. Tran, Keith B. Hartman, Jeyarama S. Ananta, Yuri Mackeyev, Lingyun Hu, Robia G. Pautler, Lon J. Wilson and Adrian V. Lee

      Article first published online: 26 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.293

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Gadonanotubes (GNTs), which are powerful new T1-weighted MRI contrast agents, were derivatized with serine amino acid substituents to produce water-soluble (2 mg/ml) ser-gadonanotubes (ser-GNTs) as magnetic nanoprobes for intracellular labeling. The ser-GNTs were used to efficiently label MCF-7 human breast cancer cells (1.5 × 109 Gd3+ions/cell) with no observable cytotoxicity. Cell pellets derived from the ser-GNT labeled cells give bright T1-weighted MR images, confirming that the ser-GNTs are a promising new nanoprobe technology for magnetic cell labeling and possibly for in vivo cellular trafficking.

    2. Evaluation of rHA labeled with Gd–DTPA for blood pool imaging and targeted contrast delivery (pages 39–43)

      Jim M. Wild, John Woodrow, Edwin J.R. van Beek, Bernd Misselwitz and Richard Johnson

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.366

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      A contrast agent was developed by linking Gd-DTPA chelate to recombinant human albumin in the laboratory. The soluble compound had a higher molar longitudinal relaxivity and molar transverse relaxivity in water than those measured for Gd-DTPA solution at 1.5 T. The performance of the compound as a blood pool agent was evaluated in-vivo and its binding to antibodies in the laboratory was also demonstrated.

  3. Current Awareness

    1. Top of page
    2. Full Papers
    3. Short Communications
    4. Current Awareness
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