Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging

Cover image for Vol. 8 Issue 6

Special Issue: Cellular Labelling and Tracking In Vivo

November/December 2013

Volume 8, Issue 6

Pages i–iii, 423–513

Issue edited by: Silvio Aime, Robert N. Muller

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Reviews
    5. Full Papers
    1. Issue Information (pages i–iii)

      Article first published online: 25 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.1508

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Reviews
    5. Full Papers
    1. Foreword (page 423)

      Silvio Aime, Robert N. Muller and Gabriel P. Krestin

      Article first published online: 25 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.1591

  3. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Reviews
    5. Full Papers
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Reporter gene approaches for mapping cell fate decisions by MRI: promises and pitfalls (pages 424–431)

      Greetje Vande Velde, Uwe Himmelreich and Michal Neeman

      Article first published online: 25 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.1590

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Reporter genes open novel possibilities for in-vivo cellular and molecular imaging. The ability of reporter genes to detect cell migration and proliferation and reveal gene expression patterns could have profound implications in cell-based therapy. Use of reporter genes can be subject to the same confounding effects that can impact the expression level in-vivo, and hamper therapeutic genetic modification. Thus, with careful design, reporter genes for in-vivo imaging could provide a much needed companion diagnostic readout for monitoring such interventions.

    2. Cell tracking using multimodal imaging (pages 432–438)

      Mangala Srinivas, Ignacio Melero, Eckhart Kaempgen, Carl G. Figdor and I. Jolanda M. de Vries

      Article first published online: 25 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.1561

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Multimodal imaging for cell tracking requires either that each cell is labeled with a multimodal imaging agent or a combination of imaging agents, or a group of cells is labeled with different imaging agents. A single agent with different, linked imaging agents tends to be more commonly used. The advantages and disadvantages or these and other issues relevant to multimodal imaging are discussed in the text.

    3. Considerations for the clinical use of contrast agents for cellular MRI in regenerative medicine (pages 439–455)

      Michel Modo, Jelena Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Francesca Nicholls, Wen Ling, Claire Wilhelm, Olivier Debarge, Florence Gazeau and Olivier Clement

      Article first published online: 25 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.1547

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Regenerative medicine is an exciting new therapeutic approach that will require sophisticated noninvasive imaging. We here discuss the legislative framework within the European Union within which MRI contrast agents can be used to visualize implanted cells while highlighting some considerations for a quality control management system, as well as potential risk factors that should be addressed in preclinical safety testing.

  4. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Reviews
    5. Full Papers
    1. Effect of r1 and r2 relaxivity of gadolinium-based contrast agents on the T1-weighted MR signal at increasing magnetic field strengths (pages 456–465)

      Gisela E. Hagberg and Klaus Scheffler

      Article first published online: 25 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.1565

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The relationships among contrast agent relaxivity, increased field strength and achievable contrast enhancement depend on several factors. At high fields, the r1 relaxivity decreases while r2 increases and the agent-to-tissue-contrast is maintained by prolonged repetitiontimes. Useful high-field agents at nontoxic tissue concentrations do not necessarily require the maximum theoretically achievable r1 relaxivity.

    2. New carboxysilane-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for nonspecific cell labelling (pages 466–474)

      Jean-Luc Bridot, Dimitri Stanicki, Sophie Laurent, Sébastien Boutry, Yves Gossuin, Philippe Leclère, Roberto Lazzaroni, Luce Vander Elst and Robert N. Muller

      Article first published online: 25 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.1552

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This study reports the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles coated by triethoxysilanepropylsuccinic acid that exhibit exceptional stability in aqueous solution. Because of an efficient electrostatic repulsion, solutions up to 70% (wt) can be produced and manipulated as magnetic fluids. Moreover, nanoparticles coated with carboxysilane are rapidly internalized during incubation in the presence of 3 T6 cells.

    3. Gd loading by hypotonic swelling: an efficient and safe route for cellular labeling (pages 475–486)

      Enza Di Gregorio, Giuseppe Ferrauto, Eliana Gianolio and Silvio Aime

      Article first published online: 25 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.1574

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cells incubated in hypo-osmotic media swell and their membranes become leaky, allowing the entry of molecules present in the incubation medium directly into the cell cytoplasm. This phenomenon has been exploited to label different type of cells with several MRI Gd-containing contrast agents. A study on cell viability, proliferation rate and cell morphology was carried out. Moreover a comparison of the efficiency of the proposed method with established cell labeling procedures such as pinocytosis and electroporation is presented.

    4. In vivo MRI mapping of iron oxide-labeled stem cells transplanted in the heart (pages 487–494)

      A. Ruggiero, J. Guenoun, H. Smit, G. N. Doeswijk, S. Klein, G. P. Krestin, G. Kotek and M. R. Bernsen

      Article first published online: 25 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.1582

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Non-invasive monitoring of cell fate is warranted for developing clinically effective stem cell therapy. Voxel-based R2 mapping and bioluminescence imaging were used as a tool to monitor the fate of iron oxide-labeled cells implanted in the myocardium. Different processes such as cell proliferation, cell migration, cell death, extracellular SPIO dispersion and aggregation exhibit different relaxivities, making quantification approaches very complex, if not impossible.

    5. In vivo visualization of single native pancreatic islets in the mouse (pages 495–504)

      Dávid Z. Balla, Sven Gottschalk, G. Shajan, Sandra Ueberberg, Stephan Schneider, Matthias Hardtke-Wolenski, Elmar Jaeckel, Verena Hoerr, Cornelius Faber, Klaus Scheffler, Rolf Pohmann and Jörn Engelmann

      Article first published online: 25 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.1580

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Direct visualization of single native pancreatic islets in vivo after i.v. administration of a targeted contrast agent was demonstrated in the mouse by performing MRI at 16.4 T. The necessary signal efficiency and contrast was achieved using ferromagnetic cobalt nanoparticles as magnetically active agents functionalized with the single-chain antibody fragment SCA B1, and by the optimization of the MR-acquisition and reconstruction protocols. Results were confirmed by ex vivo MRI, immunohistochemistry and numerical simulations.

    6. Evaluating reporter genes of different luciferases for optimized in vivo bioluminescence imaging of transplanted neural stem cells in the brain (pages 505–513)

      Laura Mezzanotte, Markus Aswendt, Annette Tennstaedt, Rob Hoeben, Mathias Hoehn and Clemens Löwik

      Article first published online: 25 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cmmi.1549

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Reporter gene properties influence the sensitivity of detection in in vivo bioluminescence imaging. In this paper equimolar expression of different luciferase reporters in neural stem cells was achieved to compare sensitivity of imaging of transplanted cells. Equal numbers of cells were transplanted into the brain: Luc2 resulted the most sensitive reporter for single reporter imaging.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION