Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and its application in Alzheimer's disease

Authors

  • Pravat K. Mandal

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh Medical School, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    2. Center for Neuroscience, University of Pittsburgh Medical School, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    3. Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    • Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh Medical School, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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Abstract

Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a noninvasive tool to measure the chemical composition of tissues (in vivo) and characterize functional metabolic processes in different parts of the human organs. It provides vital biological information at the molecular level. Combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), an integrated MRI/MRS examination provides anatomical structure, pathological function, and biochemical information about a living system. MRS provides a link between the biochemical alterations and the pathophysiology of disease. This article provides a comprehensive description of the MRS technique and its application in Alzheimer's disease (AD) research. This review is a primer for students and researchers seeking a firm theoretical understanding of MRS physics as well as its application in clinical AD research. © 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Concepts Magn Reson Part A 30A: 40–64, 2007.

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