Differences in treatment patterns for localized breast carcinoma among Asian/Pacific islander women

Authors


  • See editorial on pages 2257–9, this issue.

  • The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services or the California Department of Health Services, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. government or state of California.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Many studies have examined racial/ethnic differences in treatment for localized breast carcinoma, but to the authors' knowledge few have included Asian/Pacific Islander (API) women.

METHODS

The population-based study included API and non-Hispanic white women diagnosed with localized invasive breast carcinoma in the Greater San Francisco Bay Area during 1994 (n = 1772). Multiple logistic regression was used to assess the association between race/ethnicity and type of surgery, radiation therapy following breast-conserving surgery (BCS), and hormone therapy for estrogen receptor-positive tumors while adjusting for demographic, medical, and census block-group socioeconomic characteristics.

RESULTS

API women were significantly more likely to undergo mastectomies than white women (58% vs. 42%). This difference remained for Chinese and Filipino women after multivariate adjustment (odds ratio vs. whites [OR] = 2.4, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.4–4.2; OR [95%CI] = 1.8[1.0–3.1], respectively). Chinese women were also more likely than white women to not receive adjuvant therapy, be it radiation after BCS or hormone therapy for estrogen receptor-positive disease. Other API women did not differ from white women in adjuvant therapy use.

CONCLUSIONS

This population-based study identified differences in treatment for localized breast carcinoma by race/ethnicity that were not explained by differences in demographic, medical, or socioeconomic characteristics. These results underscore the importance of looking at treatment patterns separately for API subgroups and support the need for research into cultural differences that may influence breast carcinoma treatment choices. Cancer 2002;95:2268–75. © 2002 American Cancer Society.

DOI 10.1002/cncr.10965

Ancillary