SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

REFERENCES

  • 1
    Couch FJ, DeShano ML, Blackwood MA, et al. BRCA1 mutations in women attending clinics that evaluate the risk of breast cancer. N Engl J Med. 1997; 336: 14091415.
  • 2
    Marcus JN, Watson P, Page DL, et al. Hereditary breast cancer: pathobiology, prognosis, and BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene linkage, Cancer. 1996; 77: 697709.
  • 3
    Ries LAG, Kosary CL, Hankey BF, Miller BA, Harras A, Edwards BK. Surveillance, epidemiology, and end results (SEER) program. Bethesda: National Institutes of Health.
  • 4
    Phillips KA, Nichol K, Ozcelik H, et al. Frequency of p53 mutations in breast carcinomas from Ashkenazi Jewish carriers of BRCA1 mutations. J Natl Cancer Inst. 1999; 91: 469473.
  • 5
    Marcus J, Page D, Watson P, Narod S, Lenoir G, Lynch H. BRCA1 and BRCA2 hereditary breast carcinoma phenotypes. Cancer. 1997; 80 (Suppl 3): 543556.
  • 6
    Breast Cancer Linkage Consortium. Pathology of familial breast cancer: differences between breast cancers in carriers of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations and sporadic cases. Lancet. 1997; 349: 15051510.
  • 7
    Verhoog LC, Brekelmans CT, Seynaeve C, et al. Survival and tumour characteristics of breast-cancer patients with germline mutations of BRCA1. Lancet. 1998; 351: 316321.
  • 8
    Marcus JN, Watson P, Page DL, et al. BRCA2 hereditary breast cancer pathophenotype. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 1997; 44: 275277.
  • 9
    Chen VW, Correa P, Kurman RJ, et al. Histological characteristics of breast carcinoma in blacks and whites. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1994; 3: 127135.
  • 10
    Joslyn SA, West MM. Racial differences in breast carcinoma survival. Cancer. 2000; 88: 114123.
  • 11
    Easton DF. The inherited component of cancer. Br Med Bull. 1994; 50: 527535.
  • 12
    Eeles RA, Stratton MR, Goldgar DE, Easton DF. The genetics of familial breast cancer and their practical implications. Eur J Cancer. 1994; 30A: 13831390.
  • 13
    Miki Y, Swensen J, Shattuck ED, et al. A strong candidate for the breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1. Science. 1994; 266: 6671.
  • 14
    Tavtigian SV, Simard J, Rommens J, et al. The complete BRCA2 gene and mutations in chromosome 13q-linked kindreds. Nat Genet. 1996; 12: 333337.
  • 15
    Ford D, Easton DF, Stratton M, et al. Genetic heterogeneity and penetrance analysis of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in breast cancer families. The Breast Cancer Linkage Consortium. Am J Hum Genet. 1998; 62: 676689.
  • 16
    Schubert EL, Lee MK, Mefford HC, et al. BRCA2 in American families with four or more cases of breast or ovarian cancer: recurrent and novel mutations, variable expression, penetrance, and the possibility of families whose cancer is not attributable to BRCA1 or BRCA2 [see comments]. Am J Hum Genet. 1997; 60: 10311040.
  • 17
    Kainu T, Juo SH, Desper R, et al. Somatic deletions in hereditary breast cancers implicate 13q21 as a putative novel breast cancer susceptibility locus. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2000; 97: 96039608.
  • 18
    Welcsh PL, Owens KN, King MC. Insights into the functions of BRCA1 and BRCA2. Trends Genet. 2000; 16: 6974.
  • 19
    Futreal PA, Liu Q, Shattuck ED, et al. BRCA1 mutations in primary breast and ovarian carcinomas. Science. 1994; 266: 120122.
  • 20
    Castilla LH, Couch FJ, Erdos MR, et al. Mutations in the BRCA1 gene in families with early-onset breast and ovarian cancer. Nat Genet. 1994; 8: 387391.
  • 21
    Monteiro AN, August A, Hanafusa H. Evidence for a transcriptional activation function of BRCA1 C-terminal region. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 1996; 93: 1359513599.
  • 22
    Dangel J, Wagner-Costalas J, Bove B, et al. Novel germline BRCA1 mutation (155de14) in an African American with early-onset breast cancer. Hum Mutat. 1999; 14: 545.
  • 23
    Arena JF, Smith S, Plewinska M, et al. BRCA1 mutations in African American women. Am J Hum Genet. 1996; 59 (Suppl): A34.
  • 24
    Stoppa-Lyonnet D, Laurent-Puig P, Essioux L, et al. BRCA1 sequence variations in 160 individuals referred to a breast/ovarian family cancer clinic. Institut Curie Breast Cancer Group [see comments]. Am J Hum Genet. 1997; 60: 10211030.
  • 25
    Panguluri RC, Brody LC, Modali R, et al. BRCA1 mutations in African Americans. Hum Genet. 1999; 105: 2831.
  • 26
    Breast Cancer Information Core (BIC). An open access on-line breast cancer mutation data base. 2001. [[http://www.nhgri.nih.gov/Intramural_research/Lab_transfer/BIC/]
  • 27
    Mefford HC, Baumbach L, Panguluri RC, et al. Evidence for a BRCA1 founder mutation in families of West African ancestry [letter]. Am J Hum Genet. 1999; 65: 575578.
  • 28
    Arena JF, Smith S, Vincek V, et al. A BRCA1 founder mutation in African Americans. Am J Hum Genet. 1997; 61 (Suppl): A14.
  • 29
    Sutphen R, Ferlita TM. Inherited breast/ovarian cancer in African-American. Am J Hum Genet. 1999; 65 (Suppl): A325.
  • 30
    Gao Q, Tomlinson G, Das S, et al. Prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations among clinic-based African American families with breast cancer. Hum Genet. 2000; 107: 186191.
  • 31
    Gao Q, Adebamowo C, Fackenthal J, et al. Protein truncating BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in African women with pre-menopausal breast cancer. Hum Genet. 2000; 107: 192194.
  • 32
    Gao Q, Neuhausen S, Cummings S, Luce M, Olopade OI. Recurrent germ-line BRCA1 mutations in extended African American families with early-onset breast cancer. Am J Hum Genet. 1997; 60: 12331236.
  • 33
    Shen D, Wu Y, Subbarao M, Bhat H, Chillar R, Vadgama JV. Mutation analysis of BRCA1 gene in African-American patients with breast cancer. J Natl Med Assoc. 2000; 92: 2935.
  • 34
    Arena J, Baumbach L, Smith S, Gayol L, Perera E, Lubs H. BRCA1 mutation analysis in 20 at-risk African-American families supports a low frequency of germ-line mutation. Am J Hum Genet. 1998; 63 (Suppl): A62.
  • 35
    Ganguly T, Citron M, Stott J, et al. Novel BRCA mutations in African American individuals with breast and ovarian cancer. Am J Hum Genet. 1998; 63 (Suppl): A69.
  • 36
    Gao Q, Sveen L, Cummings S, et al. Contribution of recurrent BRCA1 (B1) and BRCA2 (B2) mutations to breast cancer in African American (AA) women [abstract]. Proc Am Assoc Cancer Res. 1998; 39: 475.
  • 37
    Gayol L, Schol T, Basterrechea H, et al. BRCA1 mutation analysis in at-risk African-American families: results and implications. Am J Hum Genet. 1999; 65 (Suppl): A127.
  • 38
    Kedar-Barnes I, Devilee P, Meijers-Heijboer H, Klijn J, Plon S. Intronic BRCA1 mutations in two highly affected kindreds. Am J Hum Genet. 2000; 67 (Suppl 2): 99 A484.
  • 39
    Newman B, Mu H, Butler LM, Millikan RC, Moorman PG, King MC. Frequency of breast cancer attributable to BRCA1 in a population-based series of American women. JAMA. 1998; 279: 915921.
  • 40
    Feigelson HS, Diep AT, Pearce CL, et al. BRCA1 missense changes among African-American and Latina women [abstract]. Proc Am Assoc Cancer Res. 1998; 39: 475.
  • 41
    Kanaan YM, Kpenu E, Utley K, Brody LC, Dunston GM, Whitfield-Broome C. BRCA2 mutations in African Americans. Am J Hum Genet. 2000; 67 (Suppl2) 94:A455.
  • 42
    Frank TS, Manley SA, Olopade OI, et al. Sequence analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2: correlation of mutations with family history and ovarian cancer risk. J Clin Oncol. 1998; 16: 24172425.
  • 43
    Whitfield-Broome C, Dunston GM, Brody LC. BRCA2 mutations in African Americans [abstract]. Proc Am Assoc Cancer Res. 1999; 40: 269.
  • 44
    Wagner TM, Hirtenlchner K, Shen P, et al. Global sequence diversity of BRCA2: analysis of 71 breast cancer families and 95 control individuals of worldwide populations [published erratum appears in Hum Mol Genet 1999; Apr;8(4):717–719]. Hum Mol Genet. 1999; 8: 413423.
  • 45
    Mu H, Newman B, Rousseau C, et al. Frequency of breast cancer attributable to BRCA1 and BRCA2 in a population-based series of Caucasian and African-American women. Am J Hum Genet. 1999; 65 (Suppl): A21.
  • 46
    Ijaduola TG, Smith EB. Pattern of breast cancer among white-American, African-American, and nonimmigrant West-African women. J Natl Med Assoc. 1998; 90: 547551.
  • 47
    American Cancer Society. Cancer facts and figures 2000. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, 2000: 48.
  • 48
    Adebamowo CA, Adekunle OO. Case-controlled study of the epidemiological risk factors for breast cancer in Nigeria. Br J Surg. 1999; 86: 665668.
  • 49
    Neuhausen SL, Godwin AK, Gershoni BR, et al. Haplotype and phenotype analysis of nine recurrent BRCA2 mutations in 111 families: results of an international study. Am J Hum Genet. 1998; 62: 13811388.
  • 50
    Neuhausen SL, Mazoyer S, Friedman L, et al. Haplotype and phenotype analysis of six recurrent BRCA1 mutations in 61 families: results of an international study. Am J Hum Genet. 1996; 58: 271280.
  • 51
    Fackenthal J, Marsh D, Richardson A, et al. Male breast cancer in Cowden syndrome patients with germline PTEN mutations. J Med Genet. 2001; 38: 159164.
  • 52
    Hung J, Mims B, Lozano G, et al. TP53 mutation and haplotype analysis of two large African American families. Hum Mutat. 1999; 14: 216221.
  • 53
    Kessler S. The psychological foundations of genetic counseling. In: KesslerS. Genetic counseling: psychological dimensions. Baltimore: Academic Press, 1979: 1733.
  • 54
    McKinnon WC, Baty BJ, Bennett RL, et al. Predisposition genetic testing for late-onset disorders in adults. A position paper of the National Society of Genetic Counselors. JAMA. 1997; 278: 12171220.
  • 55
    Bennett RL, Steinhaus KA, Uhrich SB, et al. Recommendations for standardized human pedigree nomenclature. J Genet Counsel. 1995; 4: 267280.
  • 56
    Fine B, Baker D, Fiddler M, et al. Practice-based competencies for accreditation of training in graduate programs in genetic counseling. J Genet Counsel. 1996; 5: 113122.
  • 57
    Lippman A. Prenatal genetic testing and screening: constructing needs and reinforcing inequities. Am J Law Med. 1991; 105: 111123.
  • 58
    Hughes C, Gomez-Caminero A, Benkendorf J et al. Ethnic differences in knowledge and attitudes about BRCA1 testing in women at increased risk. Patient Educ Couns. 1997; 32: 5162.
  • 59
    McCabe M, Varricchio C, Padberg R. Efforts to recruit the economically disadvantaged to national clinical trials. Semin Oncol Nurs. 1994; 10: 123129.
  • 60
    Palos G. Cultural heritage: cancer screening and early detection. Semin Oncol Nurs. 1994; 10: 104113.
  • 61
    Back B, Ades T. American Cancer Society urban demonstration projects: models for successful intervention. Semin Oncol Nurs. 1994; 10: 96103.
  • 62
    Olopade O, Cummings S, Malone D, et al. Acceptance of BRCA1/BRCA2 testing is high among cancer patients from high risk families. Proc Am Soc Clin Oncol. 1997; 16: S349.
  • 63
    Royal C, Baffoe-Bonnie A, Kittles R, et al. Recruitment experience in the first phase of the African American Hereditary Prostate Cancer (AAHPC) Study. Ann Epidemiol. 2000; 10 (8 Suppl ): S6877.
  • 64
    Eisen A, Rebbeck T, Lynch H, et al. Reduction in breast cancer risk following bilateral prophylactic oophorectomy in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Am J Hum Genet. 2000; 67 (Suppl 2): A250.
  • 65
    Weber B, Punzalan C, Eisen A, et al. Ovarian cancer risk reduction after bilateral prophylactic oophorectomy (BPO) in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Am J Hum Genet. 2000; 67 (Suppl 2): A251.
  • 66
    Hughes C, Gomez-Caminero A, Benkendorf J, et al. Ethnic differences in knowledge and attitudes about BRCA1 testing in women at increased risk. Patient Educ Couns. 1997; 32: 5162.
  • 67
    Schwartz MD, Hughes C, Roth J, et al. Spiritual faith and genetic testing decisions among high-risk breast cancer probands. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2000; 9: 381385.
  • 68
    Cummings S, Sellergren S, Olopade O, Matthews A, Schum P. Cancer risk perception and genetic counseling among African American women [abstract]. Proc Am Soc Clin Oncol. 2000; 19: 617A.