The biology of breast carcinoma

Authors

  • Judith Clancy Keen Ph.D.,

    1. The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
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  • Nancy E. Davidson M.D.

    Corresponding author
    1. The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
    • The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 1650 Orleans Street, Baltimore, MD 21231
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Abstract

The biology of breast carcinoma is complex, with multiple factors contributing to its development and progression. The current review focuses on the role of several critical genes including estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, retinoic acid receptor-β, epidermal growth factor receptor family members, p53, BRCA1, and BRCA2 as risk factors for the development of disease, predictors of prognosis and response to therapy, and as therapeutic targets. Studies of the biology of these and other genes that contribute to the development and progression of breast carcinoma have had and will continue to have great impact on all aspects of disease management. Cancer 2003;97(3 Suppl):825–33. © 2003 American Cancer Society.

DOI 10.1002/cncr.11126

Ancillary