Cognitive-behavioral stress management improves stress-management skills and quality of life in men recovering from treatment of prostate carcinoma

Authors

  • Frank J. Penedo Ph.D.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida
    2. Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida
    3. Miami Veterans Administration Medical Center, Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Miami, Florida
    • Department of Psychology, University of Miami, P.O. Box 248185, Coral Gables, FL 33134
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    • Fax: (305) 243-2559

  • Jason R. Dahn Ph.D.,

    1. Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida
    2. Miami Veterans Administration Medical Center, Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Miami, Florida
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  • Ivan Molton M.A.,

    1. Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida
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  • Jeffrey S. Gonzalez M.S.,

    1. Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida
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  • David Kinsinger B.S.,

    1. Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida
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  • Bernard A. Roos M.D.,

    1. Miami Veterans Administration Medical Center, Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Miami, Florida
    2. Department of Medicine, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida
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  • Charles S. Carver Ph.D.,

    1. Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida
    2. Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida
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  • Neil Schneiderman Ph.D.,

    1. Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida
    2. Miami Veterans Administration Medical Center, Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Miami, Florida
    3. Department of Medicine, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida
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  • Michael H. Antoni Ph.D.

    1. Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida
    2. Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida
    3. Miami Veterans Administration Medical Center, Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Miami, Florida
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Abstract

BACKGROUND

The current study evaluated the efficacy of a 10-week, group-based, cognitive-behavioral stress management (CBSM) intervention relative to a half-day seminar in improving quality of life (QoL) among men who were treated for localized prostate carcinoma (PC) with either radical prostatectomy (RP) or radiation therapy.

METHODS

Ninety-two men were assigned randomly to either the 10-week CBSM group intervention or a 1-day seminar (control group). The intervention was designed to improve QoL by helping participants to identify and effectively manage stressful experiences and was focused on the treatment-related sequelae of PC.

RESULTS

A hierarchical regression model was used to predict postintervention QoL. The final model, including all predictors and relevant covariates (i.e., income, baseline QoL, ethnicity, and group condition), explained 62.1% of the variance in QoL scores. Group assignment was a significant predictor (β = − 0.14; P = 0.03) of QoL after the 10-week intervention period, even after controlling for ethnicity, income, and baseline QoL. Post-hoc analyses revealed that individuals in the CBSM intervention condition showed significant improvements in QoL relative to men in the 1-day control seminar. Improved QoL was mediated by greater perceived stress-management skill.

CONCLUSIONS

A 10-week cognitive-behavioral group intervention was effective in improving the QoL in men treated for PC, and these changes were associated significantly with intervention-associated increases in perceived stress-management skills. Cancer 2004;100:192–200. © 2003 American Cancer Society.

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