National estimates of medical costs incurred by nonelderly cancer patients

Authors

  • David H. Howard Ph.D.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Health Policy and Management, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
    • Department of Health Policy and Management, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, 1518 Clifton Road, NE, Atlanta, GA 30322
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    • Fax: (404) 727-9198

  • Noelle-Angelique Molinari Ph.D.,

    1. Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Kenneth E. Thorpe Ph.D.

    1. Department of Health Policy and Management, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • This article is a U.S. Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  • The views expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the views of the Centers for Disease Control or the U.S. Government.

Abstract

Cancer-attributable spending as a percent of aggregate medical spending by nonelderly individuals is between 4.7% and 6.3%. A program to provide insurance coverage to nonelderly cancer patients would cost the government at least $30 billion, and possibly as much as $47 billion, annually.

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