Promoting cancer screening: Learning from experience

Authors

  • Helen I. Meissner Ph.D., Sc.M.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Applied Cancer Screening Research Branch, Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland
    • Applied Cancer Screening Research Branch, Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 6130 Executive Boulevard, Suite 4102, Rockville, MD 20852
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    • Fax: (301) 480-6637

  • Robert A. Smith Ph.D.,

    1. Cancer Control Sciences Department, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Barbara K. Rimer Dr.P.H.,

    1. Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
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  • Katherine M. Wilson Ph.D., M.P.H.,

    1. Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • William Rakowski Ph.D.,

    1. Department of Community Health and Center for Gerontology and Health Care Research, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
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  • Sally W. Vernon Ph.D.,

    1. Department of Epidemiology and Behavioral Sciences, Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research, University of Texas-Houston School of Public Health, Houston, Texas
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  • Peter A. Briss M.D., M.P.H.

    1. Systematic Reviews Section, Community Guide Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

Abstract

This article provides an overview of behavioral and social science cancer screening intervention research and introduces the scope of topics addressed in this supplement to Cancer. The authors identify and address issues to consider before conducting interventions to promote the uptake of screening tests, such as the benefits and harms associated with screening. Trends in the use of cancer screening tests are discussed in the context of their efficacy and adoption over time. Both the development and breadth of social and behavioral intervention research intended to increase the use of effective tests are reviewed as background for the articles that follow. The application of the lessons from this extensive knowledge base not only should accelerate the uptake of the effective cancer screening tests currently available, but also can guide future directions for research. Cancer 2004. Published 2004 by the American Cancer Society.

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