Assessing the impact of cancer on work outcomes

What are the research needs?

Authors

  • John F. Steiner M.D., M.P.H.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Colorado Health Outcomes Program, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, Colorado
    2. Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, Colorado
    • Colorado Health Outcomes Program, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, P.O. Box 6508, F443, Aurora, CO 80045-0508
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    • Fax: (303) 724-1839

  • Tia A. Cavender M.A.,

    1. Colorado Health Outcomes Program, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, Colorado
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  • Deborah S. Main Ph.D.,

    1. Colorado Health Outcomes Program, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, Colorado
    2. Department of Family Medicine, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, Colorado
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  • Cathy J. Bradley Ph.D.

    1. Department of Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan
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  • The opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Cancer Institute or the U.S. Government.

Abstract

Cancer may have a major impact on the capacity of survivors to work, with important economic, personal, and social implications. In this commentary, the authors identify six methodologic criteria for evaluating the return-to-work literature for cancer survivors, and they propose a conceptual model to guide future research.

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