Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation among patients with leukemia of all ages in Texas

Authors

  • Jessica P. Hwang M.D., M.P.H.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of General Internal Medicine, Ambulatory Treatment and Emergency Care, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
    • Department of General Internal Medicine, Ambulatory Treatment and Emergency Care, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard., Unit 437, Houston, TX 77030
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    • Fax: (713) 745-3674

  • Tony P. Lam Ph.D.,

    1. Department of General Internal Medicine, Ambulatory Treatment and Emergency Care, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
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  • Deborah S. Cohen M.S.,

    1. Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
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  • Michele L. Donato M.D.,

    1. Department of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
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  • Jane M. Geraci M.D., M.P.H.

    1. Department of General Internal Medicine, Ambulatory Treatment and Emergency Care, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
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  • Presented in part at the 130th Annual Meeting of the American Public Health Association, Philadelphia, PA, November 9–13, 2002. Portions of the current study have been published in the Abstracts of the 130th Annual Meeting of the American Public Health Association and in the Abstracts of the 38th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Orlando, Florida, May 18–21, 2002.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an effective but expensive medical procedure to which some ethnic minorities, the elderly, and those without insurance have been shown to have limited access. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether socioeconomic factors were associated with HSCT usage rates in patients with leukemia.

METHODS

The authors identified 6574 patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukeima, chronic myelogenous leukemia, or other leukemias from the 1999 Texas Hospital Inpatient Discharge Public Use Data File. Of these patients, 1604 received an autologous or allogeneic HSCT. The authors assessed patients' ethnicity, payer status, age, gender, and comorbid medical conditions. Logistic regression was used to control for patient characteristics and to evaluate associations among payer status, ethnicity, and HSCT use. P ≤ 0.05 indicated statistical significance.

RESULTS

Patients who self-paid had the highest rate of HSCT use in all age groups (32%; P ≤ 0.01) and in the adult group (36%; P = 0.11). Elderly patients with Medicare had a low rate of HSCT use (17%; P = 0.13). Logistic regression showed no statistically significant associations between payer status or ethnicity and HSCT use. However, elderly women were significantly less likely to undergo HSCT than elderly men (odds ratio, 0.34; P ≤ 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

The lack of statistically significant differences in HSCT use among adult patients with leukemia was surprising because previous studies had shown differences in HSCT by ethnicity and insurance. Cancer 2004. © 2004 American Cancer Society.

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