Body mass index is weakly associated with, and not a helpful predictor of, disease progression in men with clinically localized prostate carcinoma treated with radical prostatectomy

Authors

  • Kozhaya N. Mallah M.D.,

    1. Department of Urology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York
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  • Christopher J. DiBlasio M.D.,

    1. Department of Urology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York
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  • Audrey C. Rhee M.D.,

    1. Department of Urology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York
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  • Peter T. Scardino M.D.,

    1. Department of Urology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York
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  • Michael W. Kattan Ph.D.

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Urology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York
    2. Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York
    • Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Avenue/Wb-4, Cleveland, OH 44195
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    • Fax: (216) 539-4731


Abstract

BACKGROUND

Several studies have recently suggested an association between body mass index (BMI) and disease progression after radical prostatectomy. In the current study, the authors examined this association and that between the reciprocal of BMI (INVBMI, 1/BMI) and progression-free probability in men treated with radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) for clinically localized prostate carcinoma.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively studied 2210 patients who underwent RRP at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between September 1986 and May 2003. Clinicopathologic variables analyzed included BMI (kg/m2), preoperative serum prostate-specific antigen level (ng/mL), clinical T classification, year of surgery, race, biopsy-derived primary and secondary Gleason grades, and INVBMI, known to better correlate with percent body fat than BMI. Cox regression analysis was used to examine the possible association between BMI or its reciprocal with disease progression after controlling for the effects of common prognostic factors. The areas under the receiver operating curve (AUC) for models with and without INVBMI were calculated

RESULTS

Of the 2210 patients analyzed, 251 experienced disease progression in a median follow-up time of 25.9 months (range, 0–143 months). After adjusting for all clinical variables, both BMI (P = 0.071; hazards ratio [HR] = 1.027) and INVBMI (P = 0.041; HR < 0.001) were associated with disease progression. However, the areas under AUC for models with and without INVBMI were similar (range, 0.794–0.798).

CONCLUSIONS

Although conflicting evidence has been reported regarding the link between obesity and an increased risk of developing prostate carcinoma, as well as an increased risk of developing aggressive disease and prostate carcinoma-related mortality, the authors found weak associations with disease progression for both BMI and INVBMI. These variables were of negligible prognostic value in men who received surgery. Studies with longer follow-up, that examine alternative end points, and that follow treatment(s) besides surgery are needed. Cancer 2005. © 2005 American Cancer Society.

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