Partnership status influences quality of life in low-income, uninsured men with prostate cancer

Authors

  • John L. Gore M.D.,

    1. Departments of Urology and Health Services, David Geffen School of Medicine, School of Public Health, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California–Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California
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  • Tracey Krupski M.D.,

    1. Departments of Urology and Health Services, David Geffen School of Medicine, School of Public Health, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California–Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California
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  • Lorna Kwan M.P.H.,

    1. Departments of Urology and Health Services, David Geffen School of Medicine, School of Public Health, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California–Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California
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  • Sally Maliski R.N., Ph.D.,

    1. Departments of Urology and Health Services, David Geffen School of Medicine, School of Public Health, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California–Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California
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  • Mark S. Litwin M.D., M.P.H.

    Corresponding author
    1. Departments of Urology and Health Services, David Geffen School of Medicine, School of Public Health, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California–Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California
    • Department of Urology, A2-125 CHS, David Geffen School of Medicine, School of Public Health, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California–Los Angeles, 10833 LeConte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095
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    • Fax: (310) 206-5343


Abstract

BACKGROUND

Being partnered confers significant benefits in survival for patients with prostate cancer, yet little is known of the impact of relationship status on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The authors evaluated the influence of partnership on measures of HRQOL.

METHODS

The authors studied 291 patients who were enrolled in a program that provided free treatment to impoverished, uninsured men with prostate cancer. The associations between relationship status and measures of general and disease-specific HRQOL were evaluated. Results from multivariate models determined the independent effect of partnership on HRQOL.

RESULTS

Partnered patients were more likely than unpartnered patients to be Hispanic (58% vs. 34%) and were more likely to have elected surgical therapy (49% vs. 34%). Multivariate analyses, controlling for age, ethnicity, disease stage, and treatment type, revealed that partnered patients had better mental health (P = 0.009), less urinary bother (P = 0.011), higher spirituality (P = 0.037), and lower symptom distress (P = 0.005) than unpartnered participants.

CONCLUSIONS

Relationship status had a positive effect on the quality of life of low-income, uninsured men with prostate cancer. Cancer 2005. © 2005 American Cancer Society.

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