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Keywords:

  • cytostatic therapy;
  • prostate carcinoma;
  • survival;
  • prostate-specific antigen

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The authors investigated whether prostate-specific antigen (PSA) velocity was associated significantly with the time to death after randomization among patients with hormone-refractory metastatic prostate carcinoma (HRMPC) who were treated with cytotoxic, cytotatic, or combination therapy.

METHODS

The study cohort included 213 men with HRMPC who were treated on 3 prospective, randomized Phase II studies between February 1996 and October 2001. Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate whether there was a significant association between PSA velocity and the time to death after randomization, controlling for treatment and known prognostic factors.

RESULTS

Increasing PSA velocity was associated significantly with shorter survival after randomization (P = 0.005) controlling for treatment and known prognostic factors. The adjusted hazard ratio for death was 1.8 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.3–2.5; P = 0.0004) for men who had a PSA velocity > 0.0 ng/mL per month compared with men who had a PSA velocity ≤ 0.0 ng/mL per month. Estimates of survival 2 years after randomization for these men were 16% (95% CI, 7–25%) and 44% (95% CI, 35–53%), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

PSA velocity was associated significantly with the length of survival among men with HRMPC who received cytotoxic, cytostatic, or combination therapy. Cancer 2006. © 2005 American Cancer Society.