Multicenter evaluation of the breast lesion excision system, a percutaneous, vacuum-assisted, intact-specimen breast biopsy device

Authors


  • Part of this study was presented at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), November, 2004.

  • Informed consent was obtained before each procedure.

Abstract

BACKGROUND.

Percutaneous, vacuum-assisted, large-gauge core needle biopsy (VACNB) provides an alternative to open surgical biopsy as an initial diagnostic tool for breast lesions, yet rates of underestimating malignant diagnoses remain sufficiently high to warrant surgical biopsy in some cases. The current study was performed to determine if the Breast Lesion Excision System (BLES) provides a feasible alternative to VACNB.

METHODS.

A retrospective review was conducted of 742 consecutive mammographic lesions with microcalcifications classified as Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) IV or V that had stereotactic percutaneous biopsy using BLES. Initial diagnoses obtained from the histopathologic examination of tissues retrieved at biopsy were compared with the histopathologic examination of tissues received from surgical excision or lumpectomy. Underestimation rates for atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) were recorded if open surgical biopsy revealed DCIS or invasive cancer, and invasive cancer, respectively.

RESULTS.

Of the 742 breast lesions, 34 displayed ADH upon biopsy with the BLES device. Two patients did not receive open surgical biopsy. Of the 32 patients who had open surgical excision, 3 (9.4%) had DCIS or invasive cancer. There were 119 diagnoses of DCIS upon biopsy with the BLES device. Four patients did not receive open surgical biopsy. Of the 115 patients who had open surgical excision, 6 (5.2%) had invasive cancer.

CONCLUSIONS.

Breast biopsy can be performed accurately using the BLES device. Compared with VACNB, it does not alter the need for surgical excision in women diagnosed with ADH or DCIS at core biopsy. Cancer 2006. © 2006 American Cancer Society.

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