Integration of human papillomavirus vaccination, cytology, and human papillomavirus testing

Authors

  • Mark Schiffman MD, MPH

    Corresponding author
    1. Human Papillomavirus Research Unit, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland
    • Human Papillomavirus Research Unit, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Room 70666120, Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20852
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    • Fax: (301) 402-0916.


  • The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is cooperating with Glaxo Smith Kline in a randomized trial of prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in Costa Rica. The company is providing the vaccines and funding for the regulatory aspects of the trial; however, data management, data analysis, and publications are entirely controlled by the NCI. The NCI collaborates with a large number of companies working on cervical cancer screening, including cytology, HPV testing, and biomarker development. All collaboration with industry colleagues is overseen by the NCI Ethics Office and is unpaid; the author has no relevant financial holdings or personal conflicts of interest.

  • These views are personal and do not reflect the official opinions of the NCI.

Abstract

There is justifiable excitement about the recent introduction of prophylactic vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 (HPV-16) and HPV-18. Preventing these infections theoretically could avert approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases worldwide. In the U.S., numerous influential advocates are calling for universal vaccination of adolescent females. Given the promise of the vaccines, perhaps it is inevitable that vaccine introduction is proceeding before full consideration of how universal vaccination would affect existing, successful cervical cancer prevention programs. Determining the impact and cost effectiveness of the vaccines unavoidably will require time. Nevertheless, it is worth describing in broad terms for the readers of Cancer Cytopathology how successful, broad HPV vaccination of adolescent girls may affect cytology and HPV testing. Cancer (Cancer Cytopathology) 2007. © 2007 American Cancer Society.

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