Cancer registries and monitoring the impact of prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccines: The potential role

Authors

  • Mona Saraiya MD, MPH,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, 4770 Buford Highway, Mailstop K-55, Atlanta, GA 30030
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    • Fax: (770) 488-4693.

  • Marc T. Goodman PhD,

    1. Cancer Research Center, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii
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  • S. Deblina Datta MD,

    1. Division of Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Vivien W. Chen PhD,

    1. Louisiana Tumor Registry and Epidemiology Program, School of Public Health, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, Louisiana
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  • Phyllis A. Wingo PhD

    1. Independent Consultant, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  • Marc Goodman has received support from Public Health Service contract N01-PC-67001 from the Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health. Phyllis Wingo has received support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for her role as a consultant on this project.

    The authors thank Mark Sherman, Hannah Weir, Lauri Markowitz, Mark Schiffman, Diane Solomon, Ken Gerlach, and Missy Jamison for reviewing earlier versions of this article.

  • The findings and conclusions of this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Abstract

The recent US Food and Drug Administration licensure of a prophylactic vaccine against oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18, the first of its kind, poses unique challenges in postmarketing vaccine surveillance, especially in measuring vaccine effectiveness against biologic endpoints of HPV infection. Historically, the national system of population-based cancer registries in the US has provided high-quality data on cancer incidence and mortality for the most important biologic endpoints, namely, anogenital cancers and some oral cavity/oropharyngeal cancers. There also has been some data collection on cancer precursors; however, this activity has been inconsistent and of lower priority. Because effectiveness against HPV-associated cancers will not be measurable for several decades, strengthening and possibly expanding the capacity of registries to collect precancer data, which are earlier manifestations of infection, must be considered. Collecting type-specific data on HPV-associated precancers and cancers. While keeping in mind the current limitations of registry operations, they discuss resources that may be needed to implement and sustain these types of activities. Cancer 2008;113(10 suppl):3047–57. Published 2008 by the American Cancer Society.

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