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Keywords:

  • prostate cancer;
  • androgen suppression therapy;
  • survival;
  • comorbidity

Abstract

BACKGROUND.

The authors estimated and characterized mortality after androgen suppression therapy (AST) use in men with newly diagnosed localized and recurrent prostate cancer.

METHODS.

The study cohorts comprised 102 men who were randomized to radiation therapy (RT) and AST and 46 men who underwent salvage AST for recurrence from a randomized trial that compared external beam RT and 6 months of AST to RT. Cox regression multivariable analyses were performed to estimate the mortality hazard ratio (HR) in men with moderate to severe as compared with no or minimal comorbidity, adjusting for age and known prostate cancer prognostic factors.

RESULTS.

After a median follow-up of 8.4 years (interquartile range: 7.2-9.6 years), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) comprised 13% and 75% of all mortality in men with newly diagnosed localized and recurrent prostate cancer, respectively. There was an increased risk of death in men with moderate to severe as compared with no or minimal comorbidity (adjusted HR [AHR], 11.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.2-25.6; P < .001) in men with newly diagnosed localized prostate cancer but not in men with recurrent prostate cancer (AHR, 2.5; 95% CI, 0.2-37.8; P = .51).

CONCLUSIONS.

The ability to measure an increase in the risk of death in men with moderate to severe as compared with no or minimal comorbidity undergoing AST decreases as the risk of PCSM increases, which may explain the discordance in the literature regarding the risk of cardiovascular death and AST use. Cancer 2008. © 2008 American Cancer Society.