Knowledge, cultural, and attitudinal barriers to mammography screening among nonadherent immigrant Chinese women

Ever versus never screened status

Authors

  • Judy H. Wang PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Oncology and Cancer Control Program, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia
    • 3300 Whitehaven Street, NW, Suite 4100, Washington, DC 20007
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    • Fax: (202) 687-0305

  • Jeanne S. Mandelblatt MD, MPH,

    1. Department of Oncology and Cancer Control Program, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia
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  • Wenchi Liang PhD,

    1. Department of Oncology and Cancer Control Program, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia
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  • Bin Yi MS,

    1. Department of Oncology and Cancer Control Program, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia
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  • I-Jung Ma MS,

    1. Department of Oncology and Cancer Control Program, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia
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  • Marc D. Schwartz PhD

    1. Department of Oncology and Cancer Control Program, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia
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Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Chinese-American women have much lower mammography screening rates than the general population. This study examined the collective impact of knowledge, cultural views, and health beliefs on intentions to obtain mammography among Chinese women who had not had a mammogram in the previous year.

METHODS:

Five hundred sixty-six immigrant Chinese women from the Washington, District of Columbia and New York metropolitan areas completed baseline assessments for a longitudinal intervention study. Validated surveys were used to measure variables of interest. The outcomes were 1) past mammography use (ever vs never) and 2) future screening intention.

RESULTS:

Only 35% of the participants reported intentions to obtain mammograms, with approximately 19% of the never users reporting intentions (vs 44% ever users). Ever users had higher knowledge (odds ratio [OR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.25), less Eastern cultural views (OR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.70-0.87), and perceived fewer barriers (OR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.70-0.87) than never users, controlling for covariates. Never users were more likely to be recent immigrants, have low income, have limited English ability, and lack regular sources of care than ever users (all P < .001). Multivariate models showed that ever users who were employed received physician recommendations, had less Eastern views, perceived higher susceptibility, and were more likely to have intentions. Among never users, being 40-49 years of age and perceiving fewer barriers led to increased intention.

CONCLUSIONS:

Understanding cultural patterns and health beliefs in Chinese women is critical to changing their screening behaviors. Interventions that address their common beliefs and specific group barriers are optimal for promoting mammography adherence. Cancer 2009. © 2009 American Cancer Society.

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