Design and recruitment of the Chicago Healthy Living Study

A study of health behaviors in a diverse cohort of adult childhood cancer survivors

Authors

  • Melinda R. Stolley PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Medicine, Section of Health Promotion Research, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
    2. Center for Management of Complex Chronic Care (CMC3), Jesse Brown Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois
    • Department of Medicine, Section of Health Promotion Research, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1747 Roosevelt Avenue, M/C 275, Chicago, IL 60608
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    • Fax: (312) 996-0950

  • Lisa K. Sharp PhD,

    1. Department of Medicine, Section of Health Promotion Research, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
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  • Claudia Arroyo MPH,

    1. Department of Medicine, Section of Health Promotion Research, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
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  • Cherese Ruffin MBA, MA,

    1. Department of Medicine, Section of Health Promotion Research, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
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  • Jacqueline Restrepo BS,

    1. Department of Medicine, Section of Health Promotion Research, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
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  • Richard Campbell PhD

    1. Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Institute for Social Research and Policy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
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  • Presented at the Fourth Biennial Cancer Survivorship Research Conference entitled “Cancer Survivorship Research: Mapping the New Challenges,” Atlanta, Georgia, June 18-20, 2008.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Adult childhood cancer survivors are at higher risk for developing late medical effects related to their cancer treatments. Health-promoting behaviors may reduce the risk of some late effects and the severity of others. This article describes the design and recruitment of the Chicago Healthy Living Study (CHLS), an on-going study designed to examine the health behaviors and body mass index of minority adult childhood cancer survivors compared with nonminority survivors and noncancer controls.

METHODS:

Survivors are identified by the hospital cancer registries at 5 treating institutions in the Chicago area; then, a multilevel recruitment plan will be implemented with the objective of enrolling 450 adult survivors of childhood cancer (150 in each racial/ethnic group). Simultaneously, 375 adult African-American, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white noncancer controls (125 in each racial/ethnic group) living in the Chicago area will be recruited by using listed, targeted digit dialing. All participants will complete a 2-hour interview of questionnaires related to diet, physical activity, smoking, and associated mediators. Height and weight also will be measured.

CONCLUSIONS:

The CHLS will provide important information on the health behaviors of adult minority childhood cancer survivors that can be used to inform the development of interventions to improve modifiable risks. Cancer 2009;115(18 suppl):4385–96. © 2009 American Cancer Society.

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