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Keywords:

  • breast cancer;
  • lung metastasis;
  • prognostic factors;
  • pulmonary metastasectomy

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical treatment outcomes of recurrent breast cancer with a limited number of isolated lung metastases, and to evaluate the role of pulmonary metastasectomy.

METHODS:

The authors consecutively enrolled 140 recurrent breast cancer patients with isolated lung metastasis from 1997 to 2007 in Seoul National University Hospital and retrospectively analyzed 45 patients who had <4 metastatic lesions.

RESULTS:

Fifteen patients had pulmonary metastasectomy followed by systemic treatment (pulmonary metastasectomy group), and 30 received systemic treatment alone (nonpulmonary metastasectomy group). The 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) and 4-year overall survival (OS) was significantly longer in the pulmonary metastasectomy group than in the nonpulmonary metastasectomy group (3-year PFS, 55.0% vs 4.5%, P < .001; 4-year OS, 82.1% vs 31.6%, P = .001). In multivariate analysis, a disease-free interval (DFI) of <24 months (hazard ratio [HR], 4.53; 95% CI, 1.72-11.90), no pulmonary metastasectomy (HR, 9.52; 95% CI, 3.34-27.18) and biologic subtypes such as human epithelial growth factor receptor-2 positive (HR, 3.00; 95% CI, 1.04-8.64) and triple negative (HR, 3.92; 95% CI, 1.32-11.59) were independent prognostic factors for shorter PFS.

CONCLUSIONS:

The authors' results demonstrated that DFI and biologic subtypes of tumor are firm, independent, prognostic factors for survival, and pulmonary metastasectomy can be a reasonable treatment option in this population. Further prospective studies are warranted to evaluate the role of pulmonary metastasectomy. Cancer 2010. © 2010 American Cancer Society.