Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion versus systemic chemotherapy alone for colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis

Authors


Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Survival benefit of cytoreductive surgery combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion was demonstrated by a prospective randomized trial for colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis. Because of a recent substantial improvement in chemotherapy, the authors analyzed treatment options of colorectal carcinomatosis in the current era.

METHODS:

Consecutive patients with colorectal carcinomatosis treated by cytoreductive surgery combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion from 2001 to 2007 were included. The control group patients with carcinomatosis received contemporary chemotherapy alone. Overall survival was the primary endpoint.

RESULTS:

All patients underwent systemic chemotherapy. The cytoreductive surgery combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion group (n = 67) was similar to the control group (n = 38) in sex, tumor grade, site of tumor origin, T status, and N status. The control group was, however, older (59 vs 51 years; P<.001). Median survival measured from the diagnosis of peritoneal disease was longer with cytoreductive surgery combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion (34.7 months vs 16.8 months; P<.001). Presence of liver metastasis was a significant negative predictor of survival (hazard ratio, 2.13).

CONCLUSIONS:

The authors concluded that 1) contemporary chemotherapy is associated with prolonged survival among patients with carcinomatosis as compared with historical controls, and 2) addition of cytoreductive surgery combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion to modern chemotherapy regimens may significantly prolong survival. Cytoreductive surgery combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion and systemic chemotherapy are not competitive therapies, and they both have a role in a multidisciplinary approach to patients with carcinomatosis. Cancer 2010. © 2010 American Cancer Society.

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