SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

Keywords:

  • bortezomib;
  • induction;
  • multiple myeloma;
  • stem cell transplantation;
  • thalidomide

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This single-center retrospective study determined the efficacy of bortezomib, thalidomide, and dexamethasone (BTD) as induction for patients with multiple myeloma (MM) who were eligible for autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT).

METHODS:

Patients with symptomatic MM who had received BTD induction before stem cell collection at Winship Cancer Institute were included. BTD induction comprised up to 8 3-week cycles of bortezomib 1.3 mg/m2 on Days 1, 4, 8, and 11; thalidomide 100 mg daily; and dexamethasone 40 mg on Days 1 through 4 and Days 9 through 12. Stem cell mobilization involved granulocyte-colony–stimulating factor and/or cyclophosphamide. Response was assessed according to European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation criteria.

RESULTS:

Review of medical records identified 44 eligible patients (34 patients who were treated in the front-line setting and 10 patients who were treated for recurrent disease) who received a median of 4 BTD cycles. The overall response rate (ORR) was 91%, which included a greater than or equal to very good partial response (≥VGPR) rate of 57% (including 20% stringent complete responses/complete response [sCR/CR] rate). In front-line patients, the ORR was 94%, which included a 56% ≥VGPR rate (24% sCR/CR). The median CD34-positive stem cell collection was 10.67 × 106/kg. The ORR after ASCT in 34 patients who were evaluable for response was 100%, including a 76% ≥VGPR rate (53% sCR/CR). Among all 44 patients, the median progression-free survival (PFS) was 27.4 months. The median overall survival (OS) was not reached after a median follow-up of 25 months, and the 2-year OS rate was 82%. There were no significant differences in PFS (27.4 months vs 23.5 months) or in 2-year survival (80% vs 90%) between patients who did and did not undergo ASCT, respectively. Twenty patients (45%) developed neuropathy, including 4 (9%) with grade 3 neuropathy episodes, and 1 patient developed deep vein thrombosis.

CONCLUSIONS:

BTD was highly effective and well tolerated as induction for MM patients who were eligible for ASCT. Long-term outcomes appeared to be similar with or without ASCT consolidation. Cancer 2010. © 2010 American Cancer Society.