Severe neutropenia at time of port insertion is not a risk factor for catheter-associated infections in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Authors

  • Beatriz L. P. Junqueira MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Diagnostic Imaging-Image Guided Therapy Center, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    • Department of Diagnostic Imaging-Image Guided Therapy Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5G 1X8
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    • Fax: (416) 813-2139

  • Bairbre Connolly MB, BCh, BAO,

    1. Department of Diagnostic Imaging-Image Guided Therapy Center, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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  • Oussama Abla MD,

    1. Department of Hematology/Oncology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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  • George Tomlinson PhD,

    1. Division of Clinical Decision-Making and Health Care, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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  • Joao G. Amaral MD

    1. Department of Diagnostic Imaging-Image Guided Therapy Center, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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  • We are grateful to Mrs. Doina Fillipescu for providing database assistance with this report.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The objective of this study was to determine whether severe neutropenia on the day of port-a-catheter (PORT) insertion was a risk factor for catheter-associated infection (CAI) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

METHODS:

This was a retrospective study of children with ALL who had a PORT insertion between January 2005 and August 2008. Early (≤30 days) and late (>30 days) postprocedure complications were reviewed. The length of follow-up ranged between 7 months and 42 months.

RESULTS:

In total, 192 PORTs were inserted in 179 children. There were 43 CAIs (22%), and the infection rate was 0.35 per 1000 catheter-days. The CAI rate (15%) in children who had severe neutropenia on the day of the procedure did not differ statistically from the CAI rate (24%) in children who did not have severe neutropenia (P = .137). Conversely, patients with severe neutropenia who had a CAI were more likely to have their PORT removed (P = .019). The most common organisms to cause catheter removal were coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and Staphylococcus aureus. Patients with high-risk ALL had a statistically significant higher incidence of late CAI than patients with standard-risk ALL (P = .012). Age (P = .272), positive blood culture preprocedure (P = 1.0), and dexamethasone use (P = .201) were not risk factors for CAI. Patients who had an early CAI did not have a greater chance of having a late CAI. The catheter infection-free survival rate at 1 year was 88.6%.

CONCLUSIONS:

The current results indicated that severe neutropenia on the day of PORT insertion does not increase the risk of CAI in children with ALL. Cancer 2010. © 2010 American Cancer Society.

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