Effectiveness of a clinic-based colorectal cancer screening promotion program for underserved Hispanics

Authors


Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hispanics in the United States are less likely than other groups to receive screening services for colorectal cancer.

METHODS:

The authors conducted a clinic-based individual randomized trial that enrolled Hispanic patients ages 50 to 79 years who had been seen in the Seattle-based community clinic in the past 5 years. A total of 501 patients met the eligibility criteria and were randomized to 1 of 3 conditions: 1) usual care; 2) mailed fecal occult blood test (FOBT) card and instructions on how to complete the test (mailed FOBT only); and 3) mailed FOBT card and instructions on how to complete the test, telephone reminders, and home visits (mailed FOBT and outreach). The authors assessed postintervention differences in rates of FOBT screening in intervention and usual care groups using computerized medical records reviewed from June 2007 to March 2008.

RESULTS:

Data analysis occurred between November 2008 and September 2009. Nine-month postintervention screening rates were 26% among patients who received the mailed packet only intervention (P < .001 compared with usual care) and 31% in the group that received the mailed packet and outreach intervention (P < .001 compared with usual care). This compared with 2% in the group that received usual care. Screening rates in the mailed FOBT only group and in the mailed FOBT and outreach group were not significantly different (P = .28).

CONCLUSIONS:

Culturally appropriate clinic-based interventions may increase colorectal cancer screening among underserved Hispanics. Cancer 2011. © 2010 American Cancer Society.

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