The cancer is over, now what?

Understanding risk, changing outcomes

Authors

  • Kevin C. Oeffinger MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York
    2. Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New YorkThe articles in this supplement represent presentations and discussions at the “International Workshop on Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: Toward Better Outcomes in Canada” that was held in Toronto, Ontario, March 11-13, 2010.
    • Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 600 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065
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    • Fax: (646) 888-4923

  • Emily S. Tonorezos MD, MPH

    1. Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New YorkThe articles in this supplement represent presentations and discussions at the “International Workshop on Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: Toward Better Outcomes in Canada” that was held in Toronto, Ontario, March 11-13, 2010.
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Abstract

About 26,000 adolescents and young adults ages 15 to 29 years are diagnosed with invasive cancer each year. Although >80% will survive beyond 5 years from their cancer diagnosis, many will develop serious morbidity or die prematurely secondary to health problems in part related to their cancer therapy. This article provides a brief overview of mortality, morbidity, and health status among long-term survivors of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer. Four examples were used to illustrate the potential of risk-reducing strategies: breast cancer after chest irradiation, coronary artery disease after chest irradiation, cardiovascular disease in testicular cancer survivors, and the multitude of health problems faced by survivors receiving an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. A conceptual model for risk-based health care was presented and future directions of the delivery of care for AYA cancer survivors discussed. Cancer 2011;117(10 suppl):2250–7. © 2011 American Cancer Society.

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