Predicting toxicity from radiation therapy—It's genetic, right?

Authors

  • Chris R. Kelsey MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
    • Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3085, Durham, NC 27710

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    • Fax: (919) 668-7345

  • Barry S. Rosenstein PhD,

    1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
    2. Department of Dermatology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
    3. Department of Preventive Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
    4. Department of Radiation Oncology, NYU School of Medicine, New York, New York
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  • Lawrence B. Marks MD

    1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
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  • See referenced original article on pages 3654–65,this issue.

Abstract

Although several single-nucleotide polymorphisms have been associated with radiation-induced toxicity in candidate gene studies, there are many important limitations to such analyses. The primary limitations include the approach (candidate gene vs genome wide), small patient numbers, lack of a validation set, and subjective endpoints.

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