Health-related quality of life among survivors of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma

Authors

  • Roxanne E. Jensen PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC
    • Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, 3300 Whitehaven Street NW, Suite 4100, Washington, DC 20007

    Search for more papers by this author
    • Fax: (202) 687-0305

  • Neeraj K. Arora PhD,

    1. Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Keith M. Bellizzi PhD, MPH,

    1. Human Development and Family Studies, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Julia H. Rowland PhD,

    1. Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland
    Search for more papers by this author
    • This article reflects the personal opinions of Drs. Arora, Rowland, and Aziz and does not convey any official position of the National Institutes of Health.

  • Ann S. Hamilton PhD,

    1. Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Noreen M. Aziz MD, PhD, MPH,

    1. National Institute of Nursing Research, Bethesda, Maryland
    Search for more papers by this author
    • This article reflects the personal opinions of Drs. Arora, Rowland, and Aziz and does not convey any official position of the National Institutes of Health.

  • Arnold L. Potosky PhD

    1. Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is the fifth most common cancer among men and women. Patients with aggressive NHL receive intense medical treatments that can significantly compromise health-related quality of life (HRQOL). However, knowledge of HRQOL and its correlates among survivors of aggressive NHL is limited.

METHODS:

Self-reported data on HRQOL (physical and mental function, anxiety, depression, and fatigue) were analyzed for 319 survivors of aggressive NHL. Survivors 2 to 5 years postdiagnosis were selected from the Los Angeles County Cancer Registry. Bivariate and multivariable methods were used to assess the influence of sociodemographic, clinical, and cognitive health-appraisal factors on survivors' HRQOL.

RESULTS:

After accounting for other covariates, marital status was associated with all HRQOL outcomes (P < .05). Younger survivors reported worse mental function and higher levels of depression, anxiety, and fatigue (P < .01). Survivors who had more comorbid conditions or lacked private health insurance reported worse physical and mental function and higher levels of depression and fatigue (P < .05). Survivors who experienced a recurrence reported worse physical function and higher levels of depression and fatigue (P < .05). With the exception of a nonsignificant association between perceived control and physical function, greater perceptions of personal control and health competence were associated significantly with more positive HRQOL outcomes (P < .01).

CONCLUSIONS:

The current results indicated that survivors of aggressive NHL who are younger, are unmarried, lack private insurance, or experience greater illness burden may be at risk for poorer HRQOL. Cognitive health-appraisal factors were strongly related to HRQOL, suggesting potential benefits of interventions focused on these mutable factors for this population. Cancer 2013. © 2012 American Cancer Society.

Ancillary