The risk of developing invasive breast cancer in Hispanic women

A look across Hispanic subgroups

Authors

  • Matthew P. Banegas PhD, MPH,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Public Health, Department of Health Services, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
    2. Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington
    • Health Services and Economics Branch, Applied Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 6130 Executive Boulevard, Room 4019B, Bethesda, MD 20892
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    • Fax: (301) 435-3710

  • Mei Leng MS,

    1. Department of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California
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  • Barry I. Graubard PhD,

    1. Divisions of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Leo S. Morales MD, PhD, MPH

    1. School of Public Health, Department of Health Services, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
    2. Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington
    3. Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington
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  • The authors would like to thank Dr. Mitchell Gail and Dr. Jeremy Steeves for their input on the manuscript.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Current evidence on breast cancer among US Hispanic women indicates a significant public health threat, although few studies have assessed the heterogeneity in breast cancer risk among Hispanics of different origin.

METHODS:

The 2000 and 2005 National Health Interview Survey Cancer Control Modules were used to examine the Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (BCRAT) 5-year risk and lifetime risk of invasive breast cancer among Mexican/Mexican American, Puerto Rican, Cuban/Cuban American, Dominican (Republic), Central/South American, Other Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white (NHW) women ages 35 to 84 years. Multiple linear regression models were used to compare the BCRAT 5-year and lifetime breast cancer risk between 1) Hispanics and NHWs and 2) Hispanic subgroups.

RESULTS:

Hispanic women had significantly lower mean BCRAT 5-year and lifetime breast cancer risk compared with NHW women (P < .001). Among Hispanic subgroups, Cuban/Cuban Americans had a higher BCRAT 5-year risk (P < .05), whereas Dominicans had a higher lifetime risk (P < .001) compared with Mexican/Mexican Americans. Approximately 2.6% of Hispanic women were at high risk for breast cancer (BCRAT 5-year risk ≥1.67%), ranging from 1% of Central/South Americans to 3.7% of Puerto Ricans; few Hispanics (0.2%) had a lifetime risk ≥20%.

CONCLUSIONS:

The current findings indicate that Hispanic women have a significantly lower risk of breast cancer compared with NHW women, although the risk according to BCRAT differed significantly between specific Hispanic subgroups. We provide estimates of the number of US Hispanic women from six subgroups who may be eligible for prophylactic breast cancer chemoprevention. The authors concluded that future studies should further investigate the heterogeneity in breast cancer risk and risk factors between Hispanic women of different origins. Cancer 2013. © 2012 American Cancer Society.

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