Cancer survivorship research in Europe and the United States: Where have we been, where are we going, and what can we learn from each other?

Authors

  • Julia H. Rowland PhD,

    1. Office of Cancer Survivorship, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health (NIH)/Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Erin E. Kent PhD,

    1. Office of Cancer Survivorship, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health (NIH)/Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Bethesda, Maryland
    2. Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, NIH/DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
    Current affiliation:
    1. Outcomes Research Branch, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, NIH/DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Laura P. Forsythe PhD, MPH,

    1. Office of Cancer Survivorship, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health (NIH)/Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Bethesda, Maryland
    2. Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, NIH/DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
    Current affiliation:
    1. Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, Washington, DC
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  • Jon Håvard Loge MD, PhD,

    1. National Resource Center for Late Effects After Cancer Treatment, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway
    2. University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
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  • Lars Hjorth MD, PHD,

    1. Consultant Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, Department of Pediatrics, Skåne University Hospital, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
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  • Adam Glaser DM,

    1. Paediatric and Adolescent Oncology Program, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, United Kingdom
    2. National Cancer Survivor Initiative, Department of Health, London, United Kingdom
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  • Vittorio Mattioli MD,

    1. Department of Critical Area and Surgery, National Cancer Institute, Bari, Italy
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  • Sophie D. Fosså MD, PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. National Resource Center for Late Effects After Cancer Treatment, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway
    2. University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
    • Corresponding author: Julia Rowland, PhD, Office of Cancer Survivorship, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, NIH/DHHS, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Suite 404, Bethesda, MD 20892-7397; Fax: (301) 594-5070; rowlandj@mail.nih.gov

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  • European-American Dialogues on Cancer Survivorship: Current Perspectives and Emerging Issues

  • The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the National Institutes of Health or the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute.

  • European-American Dialogues on Cancer Survivorship: Current Perspectives and Emerging Issues

  • This supplement was guest edited by Vittorio Mattioli, MD (NCRC, Bari, Italy) and Kevin Stein, PhD (American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia) and was produced with the authoritative contribution of 58 authors from the European Union and the United States. The primary aims are to highlight the potential differences between European and American approaches to cancer survivors' issues, increase coordination among oncologists and other primary care providers, and aid the development of a shared care model that can improve the quality of cancer care.

  • The opinions or views expressed in this supplement are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions or recommendations of the journal editors, the American Cancer Society, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., or the National Cancer Research Centre Istituto “Tumori Giovanni Paolo II” Bari.

Abstract

The growing number of cancer survivors worldwide has led to of the emergence of diverse survivorship movements in the United States and Europe. Understanding the evolution of cancer survivorship within the context of different political and health care systems is important for identifying the future steps that need to be taken and collaborations needed to promote research among and enhance the care of those living after cancer. The authors first review the history of survivorship internationally and important related events in both the United States and Europe. Lessons learned from survivorship research are then broadly discussed, followed by examination of the infrastructure needed to sustain and advance this work, including platforms for research, assessment tools, and vehicles for the dissemination of findings. Future perspectives concern the identification of collaborative opportunities for investigators in Europe and the United States to accelerate the pace of survivorship science going forward. Cancer 2013;119(11 suppl):2094-108. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

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