Which of these things is not like the others?

Authors

  • Jay S. Kaufman PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
    • Corresponding author: Jay S. Kaufman, PhD, Canada Research Chair in Health Disparities, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, McGill University, 1020 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec H3A 1A2, Canada; Fax: (514) 398-4503; jay.kaufman@mcgill.ca

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  • Richard F. MacLehose PhD

    1. Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
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Abstract

Many published reports in cancer epidemiology assert subgroup-specific effects without adequate justification. Heterogeneity tests play an important role in justifying claims that an exposure has an effect only on one or another subgroup.

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