Ipilimumab before BRAF inhibitor treatment may be more beneficial than vice versa for the majority of patients with advanced melanoma

Authors

  • Paolo A. Ascierto MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Melanoma, Cancer Immunotherapy and Innovative Therapy Unit, Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione “G. Pascale”, Naples, Italy
    • Corresponding author: Paolo A. Ascierto, MD, Melanoma, Cancer Immunotherapy and Innovative Therapy Unit, Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione “G. Pascale”, 80131 Napoli, Italy; Fax: (011) 39 081 5903 841; paolo.ascierto@gmail.com and Kim Margolin, MD, University of Washington, 825 Eastlake Ave E, MS: G4-810, Seattle, WA, 98109; Fax: (206)288-6681; kmargoli@seattlecca.org

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  • Kim Margolin MD

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Washington, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, Washington
    • Corresponding author: Paolo A. Ascierto, MD, Melanoma, Cancer Immunotherapy and Innovative Therapy Unit, Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione “G. Pascale”, 80131 Napoli, Italy; Fax: (011) 39 081 5903 841; paolo.ascierto@gmail.com and Kim Margolin, MD, University of Washington, 825 Eastlake Ave E, MS: G4-810, Seattle, WA, 98109; Fax: (206)288-6681; kmargoli@seattlecca.org

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  • See referenced original article on pages 1695-1701, this issue.

Abstract

The use of sequential therapy with ipilimumab and vemurafenib reported by Ackerman et al in this issue demonstrates that patients who failed BRAF inhibitor therapy appeared to have an inferior outcome than patients who received ipilimumab followed by BRAF inhibitor therapy. These results are in line with previous experience and provide additional evidence to support the use of ipilimumab before a BRAF inhibitor in the majority of patients with advanced melanoma who have an activating BRAF mutation and who are treated outside of a clinical trial.

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