Improving colorectal cancer screening in Asian Americans: Results of a randomized intervention study

Authors

  • Patricia A. Carney PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Family Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon
    2. Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon
    • Corresponding author: Patricia A. Carney, PhD, Department of Family Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239; Fax: (503) 494-2746; carneyp@ohsu.edu

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  • Frances Lee-Lin RN, PhD,

    1. School of Nursing, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon
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  • Solange Mongoue-Tchokote MS,

    1. The Knight Cancer Institute Biostatistics Shared Resource, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon
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  • Motomi Mori PhD,

    1. Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon
    2. The Knight Cancer Institute Biostatistics Shared Resource, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon
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  • Holden Leung BA, MSW,

    1. Asian Health and Service Center, Portland, Oregon
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  • Christine Lau MA,

    1. Asian Health and Service Center, Portland, Oregon
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  • T. Domi Le MD,

    1. Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon
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  • David A. Lieberman MD

    1. Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon
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Abstract

BACKGROUND

The objective of this study was to use a randomized controlled trial design to test the impact of an educational intervention delivered by specially trained community health workers among Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese participants ages 50 to 75 years on knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and intentions regarding colorectal cancer screening.

METHODS

Baseline data were collected on participants' demographic characteristics, knowledge, attitudes, beliefs about cancer, its risk factors, and intention to keep up to date on cancer screening in the future. Fifteen intervention sessions were held between April and June of 2011. Follow-up surveys were administered in the postintervention period to both intervention and control participants. Those randomized to the control group received educational pamphlets in their native language.

RESULTS

The intervention had the greatest influence on the Chinese subgroup, which had improved scores relative to the control group for perceived behavior control and intentions (preintervention vs postintervention change: control group, −0.16; intervention group, 0.11; P = .004), behavioral beliefs on cancer screening (preintervention vs postintervention change: control group, −0.06; intervention group, 0.24; P = .0001), and attitudes toward behavior (preintervention vs postintervention change: control group, −0.24; intervention group, 0.35; P ≤ .0001). The intervention had no effect on behavioral beliefs about cancer, control beliefs, or perceived behavioral control (reliance on family). Although the intention to stay up to date for cancer screening increased in 2 study groups (Chinese and Vietnamese), these increases were not significant.

CONCLUSIONS

An educational program delivered by culturally specific community health educators using culturally appropriate language influences some knowledge, attitude, and behavioral beliefs but not others. Cancer 2014;120:1702–1712. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

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