Octreotide long-acting repeatable use among elderly patients with carcinoid syndrome and survival outcomes: A population-based analysis

Authors

  • Chan Shen PhD,

    1. Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
    2. Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
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    • The first 2 authors contributed equally to this article.

  • Ya-Chen Tina Shih PhD,

    1. Section of Hospital Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
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    • The first 2 authors contributed equally to this article.

  • Ying Xu MD, MS,

    1. Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
    2. Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
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  • James C. Yao MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
    • Corresponding author: James C. Yao, MD, Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Unit 426, Houston, TX 77030; Fax: (713) 563-0539; jyao@mdanderson.org

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  • This study used the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database. The interpretation and reporting of these data are the sole responsibility of the authors. We acknowledge the efforts of the Applied Research Program, National Cancer Institute; the Office of Research, Development and Information, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Information Management Services Inc; and the SEER program tumor registries in the creation of the SEER-Medicare database.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Octreotide long-acting repeatable (LAR) is indicated for the treatment of carcinoid syndrome and diarrhea related to VIPoma, and may delay tumor growth in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). To the authors' knowledge, the pattern of octreotide LAR use in clinical practice and its impact on survival outcomes has not been well documented.

METHODS

Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database, the authors identified patients with NET aged ≥ 65 years who were diagnosed between July 1999 and December 2007. Patients with US Food and Drug Administration-approved indications for octreotide LAR were identified from Medicare claims. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to ascertain factors associated with octreotide LAR use, whereas the Cox proportional hazards model was used to evaluate the impact of octreotide LAR on survival.

RESULTS

Among those with Food and Drug Administration-approved indications, 245 of 4848 patients with distant-stage disease (51%) and 81 of 807 patients with local/regional disease (10%) initiated treatment with octreotide LAR within 6 months of diagnosis. Multivariate logistic regression indicated that among those with distant-stage disease, older age (≥ 80 years vs 65-69 years) (odds ratio [OR], 0.43; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.23-0.81), female sex (OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.40-0.97), and living in the South (vs Northeast) (OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.18-0.72) were associated with a lower likelihood of using octreotide LAR. The multivariate proportional hazards model showed that octreotide LAR provided a significant 5-year survival benefit for patients with distant-stage disease (hazards ratio, 0.61; P ≤ .001), whereas this survival benefit was not shown for the patients with local/regional stage (hazards ratio, 0.88; P = .563).

CONCLUSIONS

The results of this retrospective study suggest a possible survival benefit for the use of octreotide LAR in elderly patients with distant-stage NET with carcinoid syndrome. The results of the current study also suggest that octreotide LAR is underused in this population despite recommended guidelines. Cancer 2014;120:2039–2049. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

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