Cancer rehabilitation and prehabilitation may reduce disability and early retirement

Authors

  • Julie K. Silver MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
    2. Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital Network, Boston, Massachusetts
    3. Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
    4. Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
    • Corresponding author: Julie K. Silver, MD, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115; Fax: (508) 718-4036; julie_silver@hms.harvard.edu

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  • I acknowledge and thank Julie A. Poorman, PhD, for her assistance with manuscript preparation.

  • See related original article on pages 2199–206, this issue.

Abstract

Prehabilitation and rehabilitation are essential components of high-quality cancer care. Screening followed by evidence-based, interdisciplinary rehabilitation interventions improves physical and psychological health outcomes and will likely reduce work-related disability and the risk of early retirement in survivors.

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