State of the science in cervical cancer: Where we are today and where we need to go

Authors

  • Don S. Dizon MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Gillette Center for Gynecologic Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts
    2. Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
    • Corresponding author: Don S. Dizon, MD, Gillette Center for Gynecologic Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, 55 Fruit St, Boston, MA 02114; Fax: (888) 922-8041; ddizon@mgh.harvard.edu

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  • Helen J. Mackay MD,

    1. Division of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    2. Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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  • Gillian M. Thomas MD,

    1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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  • Theresa L. Werner MD,

    1. Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah
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  • Elise C. Kohn MD,

    1. Gynecologic Cancer Therapeutics, Clinical Investigations Branch, Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program, Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Dina Hess RN, CTR,

    1. National Cancer Institute Gynecologic Oncology Steering Committees, EMMES Corporation, Rockville, Maryland
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  • Peter G. Rose MD,

    1. Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio
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  • Allan L. Covens MD

    1. Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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  • We thank the other members of the faculty who participated in the Cervical Cancer State of the Science Symposium and whose presentations were critical to the assembly of this article: Charles Kunos, Adam Dicker, Christian Hinrichs, Samir Khlief, Yvonne Lin-Liu, Warner K. Huh, Alexi Wright, Akinyemi Ojesina, Bradley J. Monk, Susanna Lee, Shamshad Ali, and William Small. We would also like to thank Michelle Small, Jill Reese, and the Gynecologic Oncology Group Committee on Educational Activities for their invaluable assistance.

Abstract

Invasive cervical cancer remains an important global cause of death, despite the declining prevalence within the United States. Definitive therapies, including surgical resection of early-stage disease and chemoradiation for locally advanced disease, can be curative. For women who experience local or distant recurrences, the prognosis remains poor and better treatments are required. On July 18, 2013, The Gynecologic Oncology Group sponsored a State of the Science in Cervical Cancer Symposium with experts, researchers, clinicians, and interested stakeholders. This article summarize the progress that has been made, questions that require further investigation, and contemporary genomic findings and innovative treatments that may help inform the next generation of clinical trials for patients with cervical cancer. Cancer 2014;120:2282–2288. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

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