The biologic effects of cigarette smoke on cancer cells

Authors

  • Samantha L. Sobus BS,

    1. Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Cancer Therapeutics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York
    2. Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina
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  • Graham W. Warren MD, PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina
    2. Department of Cell and Molecular Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina
    • Corresponding author: Graham Warren MD, PhD, Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of South Carolina, 169 Ashley Avenue MSC 318, Charleston, SC 29425; Fax: (843) 876-2297; warrengw@musc.edu

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Abstract

Smoking is one of the largest preventable risk factors for developing cancer, and continued smoking by cancer patients is associated with increased toxicity, recurrence, risk of second primary cancer, and mortality. Cigarette smoke (CS) contains thousands of chemicals, including many known carcinogens. The carcinogenic effects of CS are well established, but relatively little work has been done to evaluate the effects of CS on cancer cells. In this review of the literature, the authors demonstrate that CS induces a more malignant tumor phenotype by increasing proliferation, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis and by activating prosurvival cellular pathways. Significant work is needed to understand the biologic effect of CS on cancer biology, including the development of model systems and the identification of critical biologic mediators of CS-induced changes in cancer cell physiology. Cancer 2014;120:3617–3626. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

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