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Cancer

Cover image for Cancer

1 January 2004

Volume 100, Issue 1

Pages 1–213

  1. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentary
    3. Original Articles
    4. Original Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
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      The process for continuous improvement of the TNM classification (pages 1–5)

      Mary K. Gospodarowicz, Daniel Miller, Patti A. Groome, Frederick L. Greene, Pamela A. Logan and Leslie H. Sobin

      Version of Record online: 19 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11898

      To ensure the continued relevance of the TNM classification, the International Union Against Cancer TNM Committee introduced a structured process for instituting the changes to the classification. The main components of the process were determined to be documentation required for new classification, annual literature review, and the creation of site-specific expert panels.

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      Increased risk of myelotoxicity in elderly patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma : The case for routine prophylaxis with colony-stimulating factor beginning in the first cycle of chemotherapy (pages 6–11)

      Lodovico Balducci and Lazzaro Repetto

      Version of Record online: 10 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11861

      Neutropenia is the major dose-limiting toxicity of myelosuppressive chemotherapy in patients with cancer. Because of the high incidence of neutropenic complications and death in the early cycles of chemotherapy and the potential for improved outcomes, prophylaxis with colony-stimulating factor beginning in the first cycle should be routinely considered in elderly patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma who are treated with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) or CHOP-like chemotherapy regimens.

  2. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentary
    3. Original Articles
    4. Original Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
    1. Disease Site

      Breast Disease
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      STK15/Aurora-A expression in primary breast tumors is correlated with nuclear grade but not with prognosis (pages 12–19)

      Melanie E. Royce, Weiya Xia, Aysegul A. Sahin, Hiroshi Katayama, Dennis A. Johnston, Gabriel Hortobagyi, Subrata Sen and Mien-Chie Hung

      Version of Record online: 11 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11879

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      STK15 is a novel gene involved in centrosome function and normal chromosome segregation. Since DNA amplification is often correlated with poor prognosis, the current study explored whether STK15 expression in primary breast tumors maybe associated with prognosis, and found correlation with nuclear grade but not with other parameters studied, including survival.

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      Correlation of tumor volume and surface area with lymph node status in patients with multifocal/multicentric breast carcinoma (pages 20–27)

      Aleodor A. Andea, David Bouwman, Tracie Wallis and Daniel W. Visscher

      Version of Record online: 1 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11880

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      The current study revealed that by using aggregate volumes or surface area measurements as tumor size estimates, multifocal/multicentric breast tumors had a significantly higher incidence of axillary lymph node metastases than unifocal tumors of similar volume or surface area. These results suggested that multifocal and unifocal tumors have a dissimilar biology and that consideration should be given to studying alternative T classification algorithms for multicentric/multifocal breast carcinomas.

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      Uncertain benefit from surgery in patients with lung metastases from breast carcinoma (pages 28–35)

      David Planchard, Jean-Charles Soria, Stefan Michiels, Dominique Grunenwald, Pierre Validire, Raffaele Caliandro, Philippe Girard and Thierry Le Chevalier

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11881

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      Resection of lung metastases from breast carcinoma was associated with a significant 5-year survival rate of 45%. Whether these encouraging findings resulted from the surgical procedure itself or the preoperative selection of patients remained uncertain. When surgery is considered in this setting, the size of the largest metastasis and the disease-free interval should be taken into account.

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      Zoledronic acid is superior to pamidronate for the treatment of bone metastases in breast carcinoma patients with at least one osteolytic lesion (pages 36–43)

      Lee S. Rosen, David H. Gordon, William Dugan Jr., Pierre Major, Peter D. Eisenberg, Louise Provencher, Mary Kaminski, Joe Simeone, John Seaman, Bee-Lian Chen and Robert E. Coleman

      Version of Record online: 6 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11892

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      A retrospective subset analysis of a large, randomized, Phase III trial suggests that treatment with 4 mg of zoledronic acid is more effective than 90 mg of pamidronate in reducing skeletal complications among patients with breast carcinoma. A multiple-event analysis demonstrated the superiority of zoledronic acid in all breast carcinoma patients regardless of the type of bone lesion. Among patients with at least one osteolytic lesion at study entry, patients who were treated with zoledronic acid had a significantly longer time to their first skeletal event.

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      Is breast cancer survival improving? : Trends in survival for patients with recurrent breast cancer diagnosed from 1974 through 2000 (pages 44–52)

      Sharon H. Giordano, Aman U. Buzdar, Terry L. Smith, Shu-Wan Kau, Ying Yang and Gabriel N. Hortobagyi

      Version of Record online: 10 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11859

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      In the current study, the authors analyzed the survival of 834 women who developed recurrent breast cancer between November 1974 and December 2000. Their findings suggest that the prognosis of patients with recurrent breast cancer has improved, with a 1% reduction in risk of death for each increasing year.

    6. Gastrointestinal Tract
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      Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC) and HNPCC-like families: Problems in diagnosis, surveillance, and management (pages 53–64)

      Henry T. Lynch, Bronson D. Riley, Scott Weismann, Stephanie M. Coronel, Yulia Kinarsky, Jane F. Lynch, Trudy G. Shaw and Wendy S. Rubinstein

      Version of Record online: 12 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11912

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      Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma, which to the authors' knowledge is the most commonly occurring hereditary disorder that predisposes to colorectal carcinoma, harbors an array of diagnostic and management problems. These are predicated on physician knowledge of its phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity, in concert with the multifaceted problems that impact on patient compliance.

    7. Genitourinary Oncology
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      A Phase II trial of suramin monthly × 3 for hormone-refractory prostate carcinoma (pages 65–71)

      Nicholas J. Vogelzang, Theodore Karrison, Walter M. Stadler, Juan Garcia, Helene Cohn, John Kugler, Thomas Troeger, Leonard Giannone, Rose Arrieta, Mark J. Ratain and Everett E. Vokes

      Version of Record online: 10 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11867

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      Suramin administered as a 1-hour bolus monthly × 3 to 58 patients with metastatic hormone-refractory prostate carcinoma induced declines (> 50%) in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and objective responses with respect to measurable disease in 37.5% and 18.5% of patients, respectively. Responses with respect to PSA and pain also were observed in patients who were pretreated with chemotherapy.

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      Is there age bias in the treatment of localized prostate carcinoma? (pages 72–81)

      Shabbir M. H. Alibhai, Murray D. Krahn, Marsha M. Cohen, Neil E. Fleshner, George A. Tomlinson and Gary Naglie

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11884

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      The authors evaluated the relation between remaining life expectancy and other variables that predicted receipt of radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy for clinically localized prostate carcinoma. Older men underwent radical prostatectomy and radiotherapy less often than younger men with similar disease stage, tumor grade, prostate-specific antigen level, comorbidity, and remaining life expectancy.

  3. Original Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentary
    3. Original Articles
    4. Original Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
    1. Disease Site

      Genitourinary Oncology
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      Platinum-free combination chemotherapy in patients with advanced or metastatic transitional cell carcinoma : A Phase I/II trial of gemcitabine, paclitaxel, and methotrexate (pages 82–88)

      Primo N. Lara Jr, Frederick J. Meyers, Lisa Y. Law, Nancy A. Dawson, Joan Houston, Ignacio Lauder and Martin J. Edelman

      Version of Record online: 6 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11866

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      Platinum-based regimens have been reported to improve response rates and survival in patients with advanced transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urothelial tract. However, the toxicities of platinum-based chemotherapy are considerable and regimens with reduced toxicity that can be administered to a broader group of TCC patients without sacrificing activity therefore are of interest. The authors evaluated the tolerability and efficacy of fixed doses of paclitaxel and methotrexate with escalating doses of gemcitabine in patients with previously untreated unresectable or metastatic TCC and reported an overall response rate of 57% and a median survival time of 18 months.

  4. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentary
    3. Original Articles
    4. Original Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
    1. Disease Site

      Gynecologic Oncology
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      Surgical treatment of recurrent endometrial carcinoma (pages 89–96)

      Elio Campagnutta, Giorgio Giorda, Giovanni De Piero, Francesco Sopracordevole, M. Caterina Visentin, Luca Martella and Carlo Scarabelli

      Version of Record online: 1 DEC 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11868

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      Surgery is effective in the treatment of endometrial carcinoma recurrences, although it is fraught with major complications and a high mortality rate. Careful selection of patients is required.

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      Early-stage cervical carcinoma, radical hysterectomy, and sexual function : A longitudinal study (pages 97–106)

      Pernille T. Jensen, Mogens Groenvold, Marianne C. Klee, Ingrid Thranov, Morten Aa. Petersen and David Machin

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11877

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      In the current study, radical hysterectomy was found to have a persistent and negative impact on patients' sexual interest and vaginal lubrication whereas the majority of other sexual and vaginal problems disappeared over time. Sexual and vaginal problems after radical hysterectomy should be discussed with the patient before and after surgery.

    3. Hematologic Malignancies
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      Splenic and nodal marginal zone lymphomas are indolent disorders at high hepatitis C virus seroprevalence with distinct presenting features but similar morphologic and phenotypic profiles (pages 107–115)

      Luca Arcaini, Marco Paulli, Emanuela Boveri, Daniele Vallisa, Patrizia Bernuzzi, Ester Orlandi, Paolo Incardona, Ercole Brusamolino, Francesco Passamonti, Sara Burcheri, Claudio Schena, Cristiana Pascutto, Luigi Cavanna, Umberto Magrini and Mario Lazzarino

      Version of Record online: 6 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11893

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      This study shows that splenic and nodal marginal zone lymphomas are indolent lymphomas with different presenting features but common morphologic and biologic characteristics, including high hepatitis C virus seroprevalence. Studies are required to identify specific biologic markers and to define the best treatment.

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      The significance of myelosuppression during therapy with imatinib mesylate in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in chronic phase (pages 116–121)

      Thomas B. Sneed, Hagop M. Kantarjian, Moshe Talpaz, Susan O'Brien, Mary Beth Rios, B. Nebiyou Bekele, Xian Zhou, Debra Resta, William Wierda, Stefan Faderl, Francis Giles and Jorge E. Cortes

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11863

      Any myelosuppression ≥ Grade 3 during imatinib mesylate therapy for patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) was associated with a worse major cytogenetic response (P = 0.04) or a complete cytogenetic response (P = 0.01) to the drug, and the effect was even more pronounced with myelosuppression of > 2 weeks in duration. Myelosuppression is an independent, adverse factor for achieving a cytogenetic response with imatinib in patients with CML, and intervention with hematopoietic growth factors to minimize it should be investigated further.

    5. Melanoma
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      Prolonged survival after complete resection of metastases from intraocular melanoma (pages 122–129)

      Eddy C. Hsueh, Richard Essner, Leland J. Foshag, Xing Ye, He-Jing Wang and Donald L. Morton

      Version of Record online: 12 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11872

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      Surgery may prolong the survival of selected patients with metastatic intraocular melanoma, but effective systemic treatment is urgently needed for this disease.

    6. Skin
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      Association of nonmelanoma skin cancer with second malignancy : The Women's Health Initiative Observational Study (pages 130–138)

      Carol A. Rosenberg, Philip Greenland, Janardan Khandekar, Aimee Loar, Joao Ascensao and Ana Maria Lopez

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11874

      In this cross-sectional study, the authors assessed the association of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) with another malignancy in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study, a study that was conducted in 40 communities throughout the U.S. and involved 93,676 postmenopausal women ages 50–79 years. In age-adjusted analyses, women with a history of NMSC (n = 7554 women) were 2.30 times as likely to report a history of another malignancy, other than NMSC, compared with women who had no history of NMSC (95% confidence interval, 2.18–2.44). The results provide evidence of an association between NMSC and another malignancy in a large, multiethnic population.

    7. Discipline

      Diagnostic Imaging
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      Screening mammography performance and cancer detection among black women and white women in community practice (pages 139–148)

      Karminder S. Gill and Bonnie C. Yankaskas

      Version of Record online: 12 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11878

      Screening mammography performs equally well in black women and white women after controlling for age, breast density, and time since previous mammogram. However, black women who present for a first screening mammogram with breast symptoms have significantly larger and higher-grade tumors compared with white women.

    8. Epidemiology
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      Long-term risk of malignant neoplasm associated with gestational glucose intolerance (pages 149–155)

      Shelagh I. Dawson

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20013

      Previous studies have demonstrated an association between diabetes mellitus and cancer risk; however, to the author's knowledge, no data concerning the risk of cancer associated with subclinical impaired glucose tolerance have been published to date. The current study found that subclinical maternal glucose intolerance was associated with a dose-related increase in the risk of developing a malignant neoplasm, particularly of the breast.

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      Ethnic/racial influences on the physiologic health of cancer survivors : Focus on long-term survivors of cervical carcinoma (pages 156–164)

      Pamela N. Schultz, Charles Stava, Martha L. Beck and Rena Vassilopoulou-Sellin

      Version of Record online: 12 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11897

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      The findings of the current study point to the significant impact of ethnic/racial influences on the health profiles of cancer survivors. The current analysis highlights the necessity of incorporating multiculturalism into research involving cancer survivors. The disparity in access to and provision of health care among minorities and the underserved is becoming a recognized shortcoming of society, and the complexities of this problem are numerous. Cancer research that has focused on prevention, etiology, and treatment has only minimally addressed ethnicity and race as important variables; consequently, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the impact of race and ethnicity on the prevention, etiology, and treatment of cancer.

    10. Medical Oncology
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      The significance of isolation of saprophytic molds from the lower respiratory tract in patients with cancer : How do the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycoses Study Group criteria apply? (pages 165–172)

      Michail S. Lionakis and Dimitrios P. Kontoyiannis

      Version of Record online: 11 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11876

      Adjustments of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycoses Study Group criteria might be required for the diagnosis of invasive infections caused by saprophytic molds, especially non-Scedosporium spp., in patients with cancer.

    11. Pathology
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      Rare ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas in patients younger than age 40 years : An analysis of its features and a literature review (pages 173–182)

      Jutta Lüttges, Claudia Stigge, Maike Pacena and Günter Klöppel

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11860

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      Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) are rare in patients age < 40 years and are extremely rare in patients age < 20 years. Such cases exhibit the same clinicopathologic findings as do PDACs in patients age > 40 years, except for a greater frequency of mucinous tumor phenotypes. PDACs in younger patients also are associated more often with inherited cancer syndromes, suggesting that younger patients have risk factors other than the usual risk factors for PDACs in elderly patients.

    12. Psychological Oncology
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      Suicidality in terminally ill Japanese patients with cancer : Prevalence, patient perceptions, contributing factors, and longitudinal changes (pages 183–191)

      Tatsuo Akechi, Toru Okuyama, Yuriko Sugawara, Tomohito Nakano, Yasuo Shima and Yosuke Uchitomi

      Version of Record online: 11 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11890

      Suicidal ideation can change even in terminally ill patients with cancer. End-of- life care that is focused on the psychologic distress of dying individuals may be a way of preventing suicide. The suffering experienced by terminally ill cancer patients may be universal, irrespective of individual culture.

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      Cognitive-behavioral stress management improves stress-management skills and quality of life in men recovering from treatment of prostate carcinoma (pages 192–200)

      Frank J. Penedo, Jason R. Dahn, Ivan Molton, Jeffrey S. Gonzalez, David Kinsinger, Bernard A. Roos, Charles S. Carver, Neil Schneiderman and Michael H. Antoni

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11894

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      The authors compared quality-of-life results from a 10-week, group-based, cognitive-behavioral stress management intervention with results from a half-day seminar for men who were treated for localized prostate carcinoma. The 10-week program resulted in changes that were associated significantly with intervention-associated increases in perceived stress management skills.

    14. Translational Research
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      Antiangiogenic activity of genistein in pancreatic carcinoma cells is mediated by the inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 and the down-regulation of VEGF gene expression (pages 201–210)

      Peter Büchler, Howard A. Reber, Markus W. Büchler, Helmut Friess, Robert S. Lavey and Oscar J. Hines

      Version of Record online: 10 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11873

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      Genistein is a naturally occurring compound that inhibits the formation of tumor blood vessels. The current study demonstrates that the antiangiogenic activity of Genistein most likely results from the inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 and from the subsequent inhibition of VEGF gene expression.

  5. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentary
    3. Original Articles
    4. Original Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Correspondence
    1. You have free access to this content
      Hypersensitivity and idiosyncratic reactions to oxaliplatin (pages 211–212)

      Pankaj Bhargava, David Gammon and Michael J. McCormick

      Version of Record online: 11 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11901

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      Second neoplasms following megavoltage radiation for pediatric tumors (pages 212–213)

      Douglas G. Gold, Joseph P. Neglia, Roger A. Potish and Kathryn E. Dusenbery

      Version of Record online: 19 NOV 2003 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.11870

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